No agreement on a spending deal that would avert a federal shutdown has been reached, House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) said Friday.

"There's no deal yet," the House’s No. 2 Democrat told NBC's "Today" show.

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Negotiators for Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidBill O'Reilly: Politics helped kill Kate Steinle, Zarate just pulled the trigger Tax reform is nightmare Déjà vu for Puerto Rico Ex-Obama and Reid staffers: McConnell would pretend to be busy to avoid meeting with Obama MORE (D-Nev.) and House Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerJohn Feehery: A political forest fire Trump's pick for Federal Reserve chief is right choice at right time The two-party system is dying — let’s put it out of its misery MORE (R-Ohio) worked into the early morning hours Friday to reach a deal on a plan that would keep the federal government running past midnight, when its spending authority expires.

But those talks have failed to yield a deal, meaning BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerJohn Feehery: A political forest fire Trump's pick for Federal Reserve chief is right choice at right time The two-party system is dying — let’s put it out of its misery MORE and Reid are likely headed back to the White House on Friday for another negotiating session with President Obama.

Democrats say that the main hang-up is riders — measures attached to the underlying spending bill that would, among other things, eliminate government support of Planned Parenthood and curb the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) regulatory powers.

Republicans passed a bill on Thursday that would keep the government open for another week; it cuts $12 billion and guarantees Defense spending through the end of this fiscal year. Republicans labeled it a "troop funding" bill, and argued that Democrats have no reasonable objection to it, though they oppose a provision denying taxpayer support of abortion in Washington, D.C.

Democrats, meanwhile, have said they'll only entertain a "clean" continuing resolution, one that would maintain existing spending for a week and contain no additional riders.

Hoyer said he expects that the House, which is controlled by Republicans, might push forward with such a "clean" extension on Friday.

"I think that's possible and hopefully we'll get there," he said.