Lawmakers shouldn't be so quick to rule out changes or cuts to Social Security, a top Senate Democrat participating in bipartisan Gang of Six talks says in a new interview.

Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — Immigration drama grips Washington Senate Gang of Four to meet next week on immigration Live coverage: High drama as hardline immigration bill fails, compromise vote delayed MORE (D-Ill.), the majority whip who's negotiating with two other Democrats and three Republicans on a major deficit-reduction plan, broke from more liberal members of his party, who want to safeguard Social Security from any changes.

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Durbin said he wouldn't be signing on to a "Sense of the Senate" resolution by Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersSen. Sanders: 'Hypocrite' Trump rants against undocumented immigrants, but hires them at his properties On The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Trump floats tariffs on European cars | Nikki Haley slams UN report on US poverty | Will tax law help GOP? It's a mystery Nikki Haley: 'Ridiculous' for UN to analyze poverty in America MORE (I-Vt.), a liberal who caucuses with Democrats, saying that benefits should not be cut. And he warned that revisions to the program, such as means-testing benefits for wealthier Americans, could be among the changes suggested by the negotiators.

"If we deal with it today, it's an easier solution than waiting. I think we ought to deal with it. Many of my colleagues disagree, [and would] put it off to another day," Durbin said of Social Security in a video interview with ABC News posted Tuesday. "But from my point of view, leaving it out makes it easier politically — including it, I think, meets an obligation, which we have to senior citizens."

But any changes suggested by the Gang of Six — which consists of Durbin, along with Sens. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerVirginia Dems want answers on alleged detention center abuse Wray defends FBI after 'sobering' watchdog report Top Dems: IG report shows Comey's actions helped Trump win election MORE (D-Va.), Kent Conrad (D-N.D.), Saxby ChamblissClarence (Saxby) Saxby ChamblissLobbying World Former GOP senator: Let Dems engage on healthcare bill OPINION: Left-wing politics will be the demise of the Democratic Party MORE (R-Ga.), Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnMr. President, let markets help save Medicare Pension insolvency crisis only grows as Congress sits on its hands Paul Ryan should realize that federal earmarks are the currency of cronyism MORE (R-Okla.) and Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoGOP senators introduce bill to prevent family separations at border All the times Horowitz contradicted Wray — but nobody seemed to notice Senate Dems want watchdog to probe if SEC official tried to pressure bank on gun policies MORE (R-Idaho) — could meet stiff resistance from other Democrats, a possibility Durbin acknowledged.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidAmendments fuel resentments within Senate GOP Donald Trump is delivering on his promises and voters are noticing Danny Tarkanian wins Nevada GOP congressional primary MORE (D-Nev.) has been vociferously opposed to any changes to Social Security, going so far as to say that he'd examine Social Security only 20 years from now (by which point he'd presumably be gone from Congress). That's when Social Security is expected to face the worst of its financial crisis.

The resolution by Sanders is intended to underscore liberal fears that Social Security would be neutered by any comprehensive plan to address long-term debt, but Durbin said that resolution goes "too far" and would constrain lawmakers too much in their ability to make changes to the program.

Nonetheless, Durbin suggested that his colleagues on the Democratic side of the aisle are beginning to see the light when it comes to deficits and debt, though not without some reluctance.

"Many of my friends on the left — and they are my friends; these are my roots, politically — are going through the stages of grief. Denial, anger, frustration, sadness, resignation," he said. "Because they understand that borrowing 40 cents for every dollar you spend, whether it's for a missile or food stamps, is just unsustainable."