Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew Boehner‘Lone wolf’ characterization of mass murderers is the epitome of white privilege Pelosi urges Ryan to create select committee on gun violence Ex-congressman Michael Grimm formally announces bid for old seat MORE (R-Ohio) and the Republican National Committee (RNC) are ripping the Obama administration's economic policies on the one-year anniversary of the "Recovery Summer."

"One year later, Obama's recovery remains a failure while economists are delivering a grim prognosis for the future," an email from the RNC reads. "Now the economy is threatened by a double dip as small businesses, manufacturing and the housing market run out of steam."

The "Recovery Summer" was a six-week public-relations campaign by the Obama administration that highlighted the $787 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, which was meant to spur economic growth.

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Speaker John John BoehnerJohn Andrew Boehner‘Lone wolf’ characterization of mass murderers is the epitome of white privilege Pelosi urges Ryan to create select committee on gun violence Ex-congressman Michael Grimm formally announces bid for old seat MORE (R-Ohio) echoed the RNC message in an op-ed Friday in which he chided the administration for increasing government spending and debt.

"The anniversary of President Obama’s 'Recovery Summer' publicity stunt is a good reminder that families and small businesses in Ohio and across the country can’t afford more spending and more debt — they need more jobs. And Republicans are listening," Boehner wrote in an op-ed on the National Journal's website.

The RNC email highlights recent polling that shows dissatisfaction with President Obama's handling of the economy, including a recent Wall Street Journal/NBC News Poll that found only 29 percent of people in the U.S. think the country is headed in the right direction.

"Americans overwhelmingly feel we're headed in the wrong direction," the RNC email reads.

The attack on the White House comes a few weeks after the Labor Department reported that the economy added only 54,000 jobs in May. Those numbers fell short of expectations and were also well below the 200,000 jobs the economy needs to add to keep up with population growth.

White House Council Economic Adviser Austan Goolsbee called those numbers a "bump in the road."