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Will's column, which is often considered highly representative of Republican sentiment, comes after McCain warned on Sunday that the GOP could become an isolationist party if it continues to call for a rapid withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan and end to U.S. involvement in NATO’s Libya campaign.

Since then McCain has come under fire from both Republicans and Democrats. Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinOvernight Energy: EPA aims to work more closely with industry Overnight Finance: Lawmakers grill Equifax chief over hack | Wells Fargo CEO defends bank's progress | Trump jokes Puerto Rico threw budget 'out of whack' | Mortgage tax fight tests industry clout Lawmakers try again on miners’ pension bill MORE (D-W.Va.) criticized McCain’s views as “uninformed.” Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyOvernight Energy: Dems take on Trump's chemical safety pick Dem senator slams Trump for dedicating golf trophy to hurricane victims Dem senator compares Trump to Marie Antoinette MORE (D-Ore.) said describing calls for withdrawal as isolationist was “completely off track.”

"McCain, however, says we must achieve regime change in Libya because if Gadhafi survives, he will try to ‘harm’ America," Will continues in his column. "This is always the last argument for pressing on with imprudent interventions (see Vietnam, circa 1969): We must continue fighting because we started fighting."

Will also criticized Graham for calling to end U.S. involvement in Libya.

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"Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamDurbin: I had 'nothing to do' with Curbelo snub Republicans jockey for position on immigration Overnight Health Care: House passes 20-week abortion ban | GOP gives ground over ObamaCare fix | Price exit sets off speculation over replacement MORE — Sancho Panza to McCain’s Don Quixote — says 'Congress should sort of shut up' about Libya. This ukase might make more sense if Congress had said anything institutionally about Libya," Will continued.

On Wednesday, President Obama announced plans to recall 10,000 troops from Afghanistan by the end of the year and to withdraw another 23,000 by September 2012. Advocates of a rapid withdrawal have cited a lack of strategic value for staying in Afghanistan as well as the hefty cost for the American presence.

In response to President Obama's plan, McCain on Wednesday repeated his concerns for leaving Afghanistan.

"I am concerned that the withdrawal plan that President Obama announced tonight poses an unnecessary risk to the hard-won gains that our troops have made thus far in Afghanistan and to the decisive progress that must still be made," McCain wrote in a statement. "This is not the ‘modest’ withdrawal that I and others had hoped for and advocated."