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BoehnerJohn BoehnerFreedom Caucus leader: Despite changes, healthcare bill doesn't have the votes Debt ceiling returns, creating new headache for GOP Letters: Congress, raise the debt limit now MORE and McConnell announced their appointments to the supercommittee Wednesday.

Boehner appointed GOP Reps. Dave Camp (Mich.), Fred Upton (Mich.) and Jeb Hensarling (Texas), while McConnells picks were Republican Sens. Jon Kyl (Ariz.), Rob PortmanRob PortmanRepeal of Obama drilling rule stalls in the Senate Chamber pressures red-state Dems to back Trump on cutting regs GOP govs: ObamaCare repeal bill shifts 'significant' costs to states MORE (Ohio) and Pat Toomey (Pa.).

Norquists organization played a key role in the recent debt-limit negotiations. Many said the group’s tax pledge, signed by nearly every Republican in Congress, was a roadblock to a deficit deal that included new federal revenue.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidThis obscure Senate rule could let VP Mike Pence fully repeal ObamaCare once and for all Sharron Angle to challenge GOP rep in Nevada Fox's Watters asks Trump whom he would fire: Baldwin, Schumer or Zucker MOREs (D-Nev.) picks for the supercommittee — Democratic Sens. Max BaucusMax BaucusGOP hasn’t reached out to centrist Dem senators Five reasons why Tillerson is likely to get through Business groups express support for Branstad nomination MORE (Mont.), John KerryJohn KerryCongress, Trump need a united front to face down Iran One year ago today we declared ISIS atrocities as genocide Trump’s realism toward Iran is stabilizing force for Middle East MORE (Mass.) and Patty MurrayPatty MurrayElle honors 10 at annual 'Women in Washington' event Five takeaways from Labor pick’s confirmation hearing Overnight Regulation: Trump’s budget proposes .5B in Labor Dept. cuts MORE (Wash.) — have not signed the pledge.

The pledge has been a target of criticism from Democrats and caused friction within the Republican Party, as some see closing tax loopholes and eliminating credits as efficient ways to reform the tax code, while others consider them backdoor tax hikes.

Both will likely be significant discussion points as supercommittee members seek to balance competing demands to increase revenue but not raise taxes. Reid has said tax increases need to be on the table as part of a final deal.

The panel is tasked with presenting a deficit-reduction package to Congress before Thanksgiving that recommends at least $1.5 trillion in deficit cuts.