Norquist endorses GOP picks for deficit panel: ‘Your wallet is safe’

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BoehnerJohn BoehnerRyan: Benghazi report shows administration's failures Clinton can't escape Benghazi responsibility If 'bipartisanship' is now a dirty word, how about a rebranding? MORE and McConnell announced their appointments to the supercommittee Wednesday.

Boehner appointed GOP Reps. Dave Camp (Mich.), Fred Upton (Mich.) and Jeb Hensarling (Texas), while McConnells picks were Republican Sens. Jon Kyl (Ariz.), Rob PortmanRob PortmanOvernight Energy: VW reaches .7b settlement over emissions Senators rally for coal miner pension fix GOP Senate super-PAC reserves M in airtime MORE (Ohio) and Pat Toomey (Pa.).

Norquists organization played a key role in the recent debt-limit negotiations. Many said the group’s tax pledge, signed by nearly every Republican in Congress, was a roadblock to a deficit deal that included new federal revenue.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidThe Trail 2016: 11 hours, 800 pages, 0 changed minds Senate faces critical vote on Puerto Rico Menendez rails against House Puerto Rico bill MOREs (D-Nev.) picks for the supercommittee — Democratic Sens. Max BaucusMax BaucusWyden unveils business tax proposal College endowments under scrutiny The chaotic fight for ObamaCare MORE (Mont.), John KerryJohn KerryBudowsky: Save Europe, revote Brexit White House: We were prepared for Brexit vote After Brexit vote, is anything left of Britain? MORE (Mass.) and Patty MurrayPatty MurrayBlame game begins on Zika funding McConnell pledges redo vote on Zika after break Senate Democrats want new round of Zika talks MORE (Wash.) — have not signed the pledge.

The pledge has been a target of criticism from Democrats and caused friction within the Republican Party, as some see closing tax loopholes and eliminating credits as efficient ways to reform the tax code, while others consider them backdoor tax hikes.

Both will likely be significant discussion points as supercommittee members seek to balance competing demands to increase revenue but not raise taxes. Reid has said tax increases need to be on the table as part of a final deal.

The panel is tasked with presenting a deficit-reduction package to Congress before Thanksgiving that recommends at least $1.5 trillion in deficit cuts.


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