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Respondents were asked to name the candidates in the Republican field. Twenty-eight percent identified Rick Perry, 27 percent named Mitt Romney and 15 percent identified Michele BachmannMichele Marie BachmannBachmann won't run for Franken's Senate seat because she did not hear a 'call from God' Billboard from ‘God’ tells Michele Bachmann not to run for Senate Pawlenty opts out of Senate run in Minnesota MORE. No other candidate broke double-digits.

The numbers are significantly lower than October 2007. Then, 45 percent of respondents named New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani as a candidate, 30 percent identified Romney, and 27 percent tabbed Tennessee Sen. Fred Thompson.

Of course, the numbers don't spell doom for the Republican candidates. All three of the most recognizable figures fell to the eventual nominee, John McCainJohn Sidney McCainSenate panel advances 6B defense policy bill McCain: Trump pardoning Jack Johnson 'closes a shameful chapter in our nation’s history' Trump pardons late boxing champion Jack Johnson MORE, and even then more than 40 percent of Americans couldn't name a Republican candidate. At the same time, the schedule shuffling at the beginning of the GOP primary process means that candidates have less time to connect with voters before the voting begins.

The GOP contenders do enjoy higher name recognition within their own party. Only a third of Republicans couldn't name any candidate, and both Perry and Romney led with a name recognition of 36 percent.