Poll: Opposition to ObamaCare stabilizes

Opposition to President Obama’s healthcare law has returned to levels seen before the botched rollout of HealthCare.gov in October, according to a new poll. 

However, the president's approval rating continues to hang at levels near the lowest of his presidency. 

An ABC-Washington Post poll released Tuesday found 46 percent of people support the law while 49 percent oppose it — an 8-point drop in opposition since last month. 

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Amid the rollout of the glitchy federal healthcare website and reports that millions of people on the individual market were receiving cancellation notices, disapproval of the healthcare law shot up to 57 percent last month, while only 40 percent of people approved of the law. 

According to the poll, the turnaround is largely attributed to young people and conservatives, even as opposition from the group remains high. 

Sixty percent of people still believe the healthcare law should be delayed, but that number is down 11 points since last month. 

While the law’s approval rating has stabilized, the poll found that ObamaCare has not met expectations set in 2010 during its passage. 

Only 19 percent of people say the reform law has improved the healthcare system, while a near majority — 47 percent — said it has done the opposite. 

Another 60 percent expect the law to raise the overall cost of healthcare in the country. 

Disapproval of Obama’s handling of the healthcare system stands at 62 percent, little changed from last month. 

His overall approval rating has also changed little from last month. Forty-three percent approve of his job performance, while 55 percent disapprove, tied with the lowest of his presidency recorded last month. 

The president’s approval rating still ranks ahead of Republicans in Congress — 24 percent — as well as Democrats — 34 percent. 

Obama’s five-year average approval rating stands at 51 percent — the lowest average going back to Harry Truman. However, it is just below Bill Clinton’s and Richard Nixon’s at this point in their terms. 

As seen in other polling, the large Democratic advantage on the generic congressional ballot has mostly been erased since the government shutdown. Forty-seven percent of voters would support a Democrat while 45 percent would support a Republican. 

The poll surveyed 1,005 people and has a margin of error of 3.5 percent.