John Bolton: Obama is US's 'biggest national security crisis'

Former Ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton on Thursday said President Obama is the United States’ “biggest national security crisis.” 

“It’s the resurgence of isolationism,” Bolton said. “Ignoring threats to our national security is the Obama doctrine,” adding that the president “couldn’t care less about” the threat of international terrorism.

The George W. Bush appointee made the comment in remarks to the Conservative Political Action Conference in Washington.

“This is a president who does not believe in American exceptionalism, a president who is uninterested in U.S. national security and America’s place in the world, who considers our strength part of the problem, that we are the cause of international tension. This is like looking at the world through the wrong end of a telescope. But that is Barack Obama’s world,” Bolton said. 

Obama’s foreign policies are similar to those of former President Woodrow Wilson, Bolton said, who argued not for a “balance of power, but a community of power" in the early 20th century. 

Bolton accused Obama of doing nothing to “avenge” the death of Ambassador to Libya Christopher Stevens, who was killed in the 2012 attack in Benghazi.

“This is a terrible lesson for his adversaries to learn. That under Barack Obama, you can murder his personal representative and get away scot-free,” he said. 

Conservatives won’t give up on Benghazi, said Bolton, who advocated reverting back to the foreign policies of former President Reagan.

“We can and must replace the Obama, Clinton, Kerry, Biden doctrine of drift, decline and defeatism with a Reaganite foreign policy. That is the key to success this November and in 2016."

Bolton currently serves as a senior fellow at the conservative think tank American Enterprise Institute. He served as U.S. ambassador to the U.N. from 2005 to 2006 in the Bush administration.

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