The third ranking Democrat in the Senate said lawmakers will debate legislation on “tax day” in mid-April, on the filing deadline for personal tax returns, that would ensure millionaires pay at least a 30 percent rate.

Sen. Chuck SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerSchumer: GOP efforts to identify FBI informant 'close to crossing a legal line' Patients deserve the 'right to try' How the embassy move widens the partisan divide over Israel MORE (D-N.Y.) said on Sunday that the Senate will debate Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseOvernight Energy: Pruitt gets Senate grilling | Dems want investigation into Pruitt's security chief | Interior officers arrested 13 in border surge | Advisers pan science 'transparency' plan Dems claim Pruitt's former security chief intervened to hire business associate Pruitt: ‘I don’t recall’ asking security agents to use sirens MORE’s (D-R.I.) proposal to enact the so-called “Buffett Rule.” 

ADVERTISEMENT
“You should, if you are very wealthy, God bless you, you made a lot of money, we love you in America, but let’s be fair. You should pay more than your secretary, and that will be on the floor April 15, Tax Day,” Schumer said on the CBS program “Face the Nation.”

The proposal, central to President Obama's platform to "level the playing field" for workers, is named after billionaire investor Warren Buffett. Buffett is an advocate for higher taxes on the wealthy and has said that he should not pay a lower tax rate than his secretary.


RELATED: Poll: Americans back 'Buffett Rule'


Obama has pushed Congress to pass legislation that he and other Democrats call a way to ensure millionaires pay their fair share.

During Obama's State of the Union address in 2012, Debbie Bosanek, Buffett's secretary, was in the audience, as the president pushed lawmakers to adopt the proposal.

The Buffett Rule, however, has little chance of passing in the GOP-controlled House, where Republicans have been reluctant to approve any tax increases.


RELATED: Report: Buffett Rule would raise less than $50B over decade