The third ranking Democrat in the Senate said lawmakers will debate legislation on “tax day” in mid-April, on the filing deadline for personal tax returns, that would ensure millionaires pay at least a 30 percent rate.

Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerOvernight Health Care: Schumer calls for tying ObamaCare fix to children's health insurance | Puerto Rico's water woes worsen | Dems plead for nursing home residents' right to sue Crying on TV doesn't qualify Kimmel to set nation's gun agenda Trump knocks ‘fake’ news coverage of his trip to Puerto Rico MORE (D-N.Y.) said on Sunday that the Senate will debate Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseDem senator: 'How many lives must be lost before we act?' Sen. Manchin won’t vote for Trump’s mine safety nominee Overnight Regulation: SEC chief grilled over hack | Dems urge Labor chief to keep Obama overtime rule | Russia threatens Facebook over data storage law MORE’s (D-R.I.) proposal to enact the so-called “Buffett Rule.” 

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“You should, if you are very wealthy, God bless you, you made a lot of money, we love you in America, but let’s be fair. You should pay more than your secretary, and that will be on the floor April 15, Tax Day,” Schumer said on the CBS program “Face the Nation.”

The proposal, central to President Obama's platform to "level the playing field" for workers, is named after billionaire investor Warren Buffett. Buffett is an advocate for higher taxes on the wealthy and has said that he should not pay a lower tax rate than his secretary.


RELATED: Poll: Americans back 'Buffett Rule'


Obama has pushed Congress to pass legislation that he and other Democrats call a way to ensure millionaires pay their fair share.

During Obama's State of the Union address in 2012, Debbie Bosanek, Buffett's secretary, was in the audience, as the president pushed lawmakers to adopt the proposal.

The Buffett Rule, however, has little chance of passing in the GOP-controlled House, where Republicans have been reluctant to approve any tax increases.


RELATED: Report: Buffett Rule would raise less than $50B over decade