The third ranking Democrat in the Senate said lawmakers will debate legislation on “tax day” in mid-April, on the filing deadline for personal tax returns, that would ensure millionaires pay at least a 30 percent rate.

Sen. Chuck SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerGOP lawmaker: Dems not standing for Trump is 'un-American' Trump called for unity — he didn’t even last a week Overnight Defense: GOP plays hardball by attaching defense funding to CR | US reportedly drawing down in Iraq | Russia, US meet arms treaty deadline | Why the military wants 6B from Congress MORE (D-N.Y.) said on Sunday that the Senate will debate Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseOvernight Tech: Uber exec says 'no justification' for covering up hack | Apple considers battery rebates | Regulators talk bitcoin | SpaceX launches world's most powerful rocket Overnight Cybersecurity: Tillerson proposes new cyber bureau at State | Senate bill would clarify cross-border data rules | Uber exec says 'no justification' for covering up breach Hatch introduces bipartisan bill to clarify cross-border data policies MORE’s (D-R.I.) proposal to enact the so-called “Buffett Rule.” 

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“You should, if you are very wealthy, God bless you, you made a lot of money, we love you in America, but let’s be fair. You should pay more than your secretary, and that will be on the floor April 15, Tax Day,” Schumer said on the CBS program “Face the Nation.”

The proposal, central to President Obama's platform to "level the playing field" for workers, is named after billionaire investor Warren Buffett. Buffett is an advocate for higher taxes on the wealthy and has said that he should not pay a lower tax rate than his secretary.


RELATED: Poll: Americans back 'Buffett Rule'


Obama has pushed Congress to pass legislation that he and other Democrats call a way to ensure millionaires pay their fair share.

During Obama's State of the Union address in 2012, Debbie Bosanek, Buffett's secretary, was in the audience, as the president pushed lawmakers to adopt the proposal.

The Buffett Rule, however, has little chance of passing in the GOP-controlled House, where Republicans have been reluctant to approve any tax increases.


RELATED: Report: Buffett Rule would raise less than $50B over decade