Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerSpeculation mounts, but Ryan’s job seen as safe Boehner warns Trump: Don't pull out of Korea-US trade deal GOP Rep: Ryan wasting taxpayers dollars by blocking war authorization debate MORE's suggestion that President Obama offer legislative language authorizing military strikes against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) was "received with some skepticism" in the White House, press secretary Josh Earnest said Tuesday.

Over the weekend, John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerSpeculation mounts, but Ryan’s job seen as safe Boehner warns Trump: Don't pull out of Korea-US trade deal GOP Rep: Ryan wasting taxpayers dollars by blocking war authorization debate MORE (R-Ohio) told ABC News that he believed the president had the authority to carry out strikes against ISIS but that “Congress ought to consider” a resolution explicitly authorizing such action. He added he would be "happy" to call Congress back from recess to debate such a measure.

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"The president typically in a situation like this would call for an authorization vote and go sell that to the American people and send a resolution to the Hill," Boehner said. "The president has not done that. He believes he has authority under existing resolutions.”

The White House scoffed at Boehner's suggestion, with Earnest criticizing the Speaker's "track record of responding to presidential initiative."

"The president has put forward a very specific proposal for reforming our broken immigration system to something that has bipartisan support in the Senate and passed the Senate," Earnest noted. "It’s now sitting on the floor of the House of Representatives, and Speaker Boehner is the individual that is refusing to allow it to come up for a vote."

Earnest said Boehner had also refused to allow votes on the president's plan on corporate tax reform, infrastructure spending and corporate inversions — the process by which companies merge with an overseas entity to avoid U.S. taxes.

"It’s a little ironic that after blocking these specific proposals that the president has put forward, the Speaker of the House is now saying that he won’t act unless the president put something forward," Earnest said.