Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellOvernight Finance: Trump takes US out of Pacific trade deal | WH says Trump has left his businesses | Lobbyists expect boom times McConnell to Dems: Work with us on GOP's 'formidable' challenges McCain: Trump's withdrawal from TPP a 'serious mistake' MORE (R-Ky.) shrugged off the idea that Republicans are waging a war on women, calling it a "manufactured issue."

"Talk about a manufactured issue," McConnell said in an interview with local Louisville, Ky., radio station WHAS on Monday.

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He said his female Republican colleagues in the Senate would agree with him on that.

"There is no issue. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison [(Texas)] and Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteTen rumored Trump Cabinet picks who didn't get a job Sasse, Perdue join Armed Services Committee Avid pilot among GOP senators joining Transportation committee MORE from New Hampshire and Susan CollinsSusan CollinsOvernight Healthcare: Trump reinstates ban on US funds for overseas abortions GOP senators: Give states the option of keeping ObamaCare GOP senators to introduce ObamaCare replacement plan MORE and Olympia Snowe from Maine, I think, would be the first to say — and Lisa MurkowskiLisa MurkowskiCommittee to vote on Zinke, Perry nominations Tuesday Trump, GOP set to battle on spending cuts What we learned from Rick Perry's confirmation hearing MORE from Alaska — ‘We don’t see any evidence of this.' "

Democrats have increasingly lobbed the "war on women" charge since Republicans strongly resisted an Obama administration rule requiring certain religious organizations to provide contraceptive coverage to employees. Democrats took Republicans' opposition to the rule and spun it as the latest example of a long list of efforts to disenfranchise American women.

GOP Sens. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) and Olympia Snowe (Maine) both voiced opposition to Republican efforts to overturn the Obama administration's rule.

On Sunday, Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-Mo.) said the charge was something of an exaggeration.

"We’ve got to quit exaggerating our political differences," Cleaver said on CNN's "State of the Union."