Report: Gingrich’s $500 check for Utah primary filing fee bounces

GOP presidential hopeful Newt Gingrich might fail to appear on the Utah primary ballot after a check for the required filing fee bounced, according to media reports.

The check for $500 bounced on March 27, Utah state election director Mark Thomas told ABC News, which first reported the story.

"Our office immediately attempted to contact the campaign and the designated agent, but no phone calls were returned,” Thomas said, according to ABC. 

“We also asked the state Republican Party to assist us, but they also could not get into communication with them, although I do not know how they attempted to contact them," he added.

The incident highlights fundraising problems for Gingrich who has struggled to raise money and win delegates, after his early victory in South Carolina's primary. In national polls, Gingrich trails both presumptive nominee Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum, who exited the race Tuesday.

Earlier this month, one of his top contributors, real estate mogul Sheldon Adelson, suggested it was time for the GOP to rally behind Romney and that Gingrich may have hit a dead end in his presidential bid.

But the former House Speaker has insisted he would stay in the race until the GOP convention in Tampa.

On Tuesday, after Santorum announced he would exit the race, Gingrich sought to recast the Republican contest as a two-man race between him and Romney.

Gingrich said Santorum's departure "makes it clearer that there's a conservative, named Newt Gingrich, and there's Mitt Romney."

Gingrich made a pitch to Santorum's delegates, asking for their support at the Republican National Convention in Florida.

"I humbly ask Sen. Santorum’s supporters to visit to review my conservative record and join us as we bring these values to Tampa," he said. "We know well that only a conservative can protect life, defend the Constitution, restore jobs and growth and return to a balanced budget."

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