The Republican bench for vice presidential candidates is deeper than for presidential candidates this election year, Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamRetired English teacher corrects letter from Trump and sends it back to White House Graham: Trump 'probably' shouldn't call use of FBI informant 'spygate' Graham on canceled summit: Trump thought North Korea was ‘playing him’ MORE (R-S.C.) said.

"The good news is I think we got a deeper vice presidential bench than we do presidential candidates," Graham said in an interview with South Carolina radio station WVOC published Tuesday.

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Graham listed Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioTrump appears to confirm deal on Chinese firm ZTE Hillicon Valley: Experts worry North Korea will retaliate with hacks over summit | FBI works to disrupt Russian botnet | Trump officials look to quell anger over ZTE | Obama makes case for tighter regs on tech Putting pressure on Trump, House passes bill barring government from doing business with ZTE MORE (R-Fla.), former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush (R), Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanLongtime tax aide leaving Senate Finance Committee Ex-McConnell policy aide joining lobby firm WATCH: Sen. Flake: “More doubtful” North Korean summit will happen  MORE (R-Ohio) and Rep. Allen West (R-Fla.) as potential candidates. 

Rubio, Bush, and Portman have endorsed Mitt Romney, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee. 

Rubio's name is perhaps the most commonly listed one on vice presidential shortlists. The argument for his candidacy is usually that he would help win over Hispanic voters and is a rising star within the GOP. Rubio has repeatedly said he would not be picked for the number two spot on the ticket. 

Portman is becoming increasingly common suggestion for a Romney vice presidential nominee. The usual arguments for his candidacy are he would help win voters in a coveted battleground state, his background as director of the Office of Budget Management during the George W. Bush administration and his experience working with Democrats. 

West's name has been floated for the presidential ticket and, unlike some of the other prospects, he's said that he would accept an offer "if it was the right fit."

"In this case, Florida and Ohio are the two great prizes. We've got Rob Portman from Ohio, a senator, who would be a really good pick," Graham added. "He's a solid guy. But you've got Rubio, Bush. You got people in Florida like Allen West, that would add to the mix."