Gingrich hints poor Delaware result could lead to exit from race

Newt Gingrich is hinting that he might finally disband his struggling presidential campaign this week if he is unable to mount a surprise victory in Tuesday's Delaware presidential primary.

The former House Speaker told NBC News Monday that he would have to "reassess" his bid if he's not able to place well in the state, where he has devoted significant time to campaigning.

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"I think we need to take a deep look at what we are doing," Gingrich said. "We will be in North Carolina tomorrow night and we will look and see what the results are."

Gingrich went on to say that he "would hope we would do well here — either carry it or come very, very close."

Gingrich's campaign has shown signs of stress in recent weeks, with the former Speaker announcing the resignations of a significant chunk of his campaign staff, including his campaign manager. Despite stints atop national polls, Gingrich was only able to win two states — South Carolina and Georgia, the state he represented for two decades in Congress. Recent Federal Election Commission filings show the campaign more than $4 million in debt.

But Gingrich has remained defiant, even after former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum's exit from the race effectively handed the nomination to front-runner Mitt Romney.

“I am committed to staying in this race all the way to Tampa so that the conservative movement has a real choice. I humbly ask Sen. Santorum’s supporters to visit Newt.org to review my conservative record and join us as we bring these values to Tampa. We know well that only a conservative can protect life, defend the Constitution, restore jobs and growth and return to a balanced budget," Gingrich said in a statement after Santorum's exit.

Despite hinting he might be nearing the end of the road, Gingrich warned Romney not to feel too confident while campaigning in Delaware.

"It is very dangerous for front-runners to start behaving like they are inevitable, because the voters might decide that's not so true," Gingrich said.