A Democratic senator said on Sunday that she’s “not crazy about” the idea of President Obama taking unilateral action on immigration reform.

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Senator Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillKoch-backed group targets red-state Dems on tax reform Overnight Cybersecurity: Equifax security employee left after breach | Lawmakers float bill to reform warrantless surveillance | Intel leaders keeping collusion probe open Las Vegas highlights Islamist terrorism is not America's greatest domestic threat MORE (D-Mo.) turned the issue on House Republicans Sunday, however, telling CBS “Face the Nation” host Bob Schieffer that if Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew Boehner‘Lone wolf’ characterization of mass murderers is the epitome of white privilege Pelosi urges Ryan to create select committee on gun violence Ex-congressman Michael Grimm formally announces bid for old seat MORE (R-Ohio) doesn’t want Obama to issue an executive order, then the House should vote on a bill.

“I'm not crazy about it. … Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew Boehner‘Lone wolf’ characterization of mass murderers is the epitome of white privilege Pelosi urges Ryan to create select committee on gun violence Ex-congressman Michael Grimm formally announces bid for old seat MORE has refused to debate one of the most complicated and difficult problems facing our country. They won't take (the Senate) bill up. All you have to do next week, if he doesn't want the president to act, is take up the Senate bill, amend it, change it, put up your own bill. Let's get back to doing our work instead of just blaming the president for everything,” McCaskill said.

McCaskill, one of six Democratic senators to vote against Sen. Harry ReidHarry ReidChris Murphy’s profile rises with gun tragedies Republicans are headed for a disappointing end to their year in power Obama's HHS secretary could testify in Menendez trial MORE’s (D-Nev.) bid to retain the position of leader in the next Congress, conceded that her party needs to make changes in light of the dismal election results.

“Our party got walloped, and I think that we need to change what we're doing, and I think change begins with leadership. It's just common sense, and it's not complicated,” McCaskill said.

The senator hinted that there may be more positions for centrist Democrats in the Senate leadership next Congress.