Adding Sen. Rob PortmanRob PortmanRegulatory experts push Senate leaders for regulatory reform Conservative group to give GOP healthcare holdouts ‘Freedom Traitors Award’ Source: Senate leaders to offer 0 billion to win over moderates MORE (R-Ohio) to the top of the Romney ticket won't be enough to seal the key battleground state of Ohio for the GOP, says a former Democratic governor of the Buckeye state.

Portman's credentials in his home state "would not guarantee" Ohio goes Republican this November, former Gov.Ted Strickland said on CNN’s State of the Union on Sunday.

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Strickland said Portman "doesn't have the standing" in the state needed to make a difference in the general election.

That said, "no candidate . . . can take Ohio for granted," Strickland added.

Portman, along with Sen. Marco RubioMarco RubioGOP frets over stalled agenda The Memo: GOP forms circular firing squad OPINION | Trump recertified the Iran nuclear deal — now what? MORE (R-Fla.), Rep. Paul RyanPaul RyanHouse Dems campaign arm outpaces GOP by M in June GOP signals infrastructure bill must wait Oil concerns hold up Russia sanctions push MORE (R-Wis.) and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) is the focus of speculation as a potential running mate for the Romney ticket.

Portman served as U.S Trade Representative and Director of the Office of Management and Budget in the George W. Bush administration and would bring strong economic policy credentials to the Romney campaign.


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However concerns continue to circulate over whether a Portman pick will generate enough excitement to get GOP voters to the polls.

President Obama has pushed hard during his first term to ensure Ohio goes Democratic again this November.

Obama won the state by 51 percent in 2008. He has visited Ohio three times since then. The President officially kicked off his reelection campaign on Saturday with speeches in Columbus, Ohio and Richmond, Virginia.


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