House Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerSudan sanctions spur intense lobbying OPINION | GOP's 7-year ObamaCare blood oath ends in failure A simple fix to encourage bipartisanship in the House MORE (R-Ohio) said Sunday supported legislation to punish individuals who renounced their citizenship in order to avoid paying U.S. taxes, but said such measures were already law.

"There's already a law in the books," BoehnerJohn BoehnerSudan sanctions spur intense lobbying OPINION | GOP's 7-year ObamaCare blood oath ends in failure A simple fix to encourage bipartisanship in the House MORE told ABC's George Stephanopoulos in an interview on ABC's "This Week." "It's already against the law."

Democratic Sens. Charles SchumerCharles SchumerSchumer: Dems, not Russia, are to blame for loss to Trump Repair is the only “R” word that can solve our healthcare woes OPINION | How Democrats stole the nation's lower federal courts MORE (N.Y.) and Bob CaseyBob CaseyDem leaders amp up calls for bipartisan ObamaCare fixes Let’s not roll back bipartisan progress on global food security Vulnerable senators raise big money ahead of 2018 MORE Jr. (Pa.) announced legislation last week designed to punish people who renounce their citizenship in order to dodge taxes. 

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Their bill, the Ex-Patriot Act, is a direct response to Eduardo Saverin, the co-founder of Facebook, who renounced his U.S. citizenship last year, and the senators had harsh words for what they called Saverin's "scheme" to avoid paying taxes on his interest in the company, which went public last week. 

Saverin's move saved him an estimated $67 million to $100 million in taxes. The wealthy technology investor however has said his change in citizenship was not an effort to avoid American taxes.

Boehner on Sunday said it is "absolutely outrageous" for anyone to renounce their citizenship in order to avoid taxes.

The Casey and Schumer legislation would punish any individual who renounces their citizenship and holds a net worth of $2 million or an average income tax liability of $148,000 over the last five years.

If the Internal Revenue Service determines that person gave up their passport for primarily tax reasons, the person's U.S. assets would be taxed at 30 percent and they would be barred from ever re-entering the United States.

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin HatchHatch shares gif of dumpster fire: ‘Checking in on Dodd Frank’ Senate panel advances Trump's tax policy nominee Healthcare debacle raises pressure for GOP on taxes MORE (R-Utah), the ranking member of the Senate Finance Committee, said his Democratic colleagues were overlooking the "root cause" of Saverin's actions. A spokesperson from his office released a statement last week saying that wealthy expatriates seeking to renounce their American citizenship is a sign that the tax code needs to be fixed.