Halperin, Schieffer critical of appearance in Romney campaign ad

Journalists Mark Halperin and Bob Schieffer are expressing discomfort with the use of their images in an ad from GOP candidate Mitt Romney’s campaign.

Romney's camp released an ad Sunday criticizing President Obama for running negative advertisements against the former Massachusetts governor. 

To make the point, the ad features Schieffer, host of CBS’s “Face the Nation,” asking "whatever happened to hope and change?" and Halperin, who writes for Time, saying "Barack Obama's campaign and allies will run more negative ads against this Republican nominee than have ever been run in the history of the world." 

Halperin tweeted Sunday that he was uncomfortable with his image being used to back up a political point from the Romney campaign.

ADVERTISEMENT
"To echo what NBC News' Tom Brokaw said in January, when his image and voice were used in a Romney campaign TV ad, 'I am extremely uncomfortable with the use of my personal image in this political ad. I do not want my role as a journalist compromised for political gain by any campaign," Halperin said in a series of tweets. 

Schieffer reacted similarly after seeing the Romney commercial for the first time during his Sunday morning broadcast. 

"It is my understanding that just a few minutes ago, the Romney campaign bought time on ‘Face the Nation’ during one of our commercial blocks and in some other markets around the country running a new ad, which includes me," Schieffer said before showing the advertisement to his viewers. 

"I'm running this not to give circulation to it, but just to state that obviously I have no connection with the Romney campaign," Schieffer continued. "This was done without our permission. It comes as a total surprise to me and-- and that is that. But that is-- that's where we are in politics." 

The footage of Schieffer that is used in the Romney ad comes from an edited clip from an interview he conducted with senior Obama strategist David Axelrod. Halperin's statement was taken from an appearance he made on MSNBC's "Morning Joe."