Wikipedia pages for candidates most likely to appear on Mitt Romney’s shortlist for vice president have been locked down as of Wednesday. 

"This article is protected due to vandalism," reads the Wikipedia page for former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty.

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Similarly, pages for Sen. Rob PortmanRob PortmanThe fight to protect the Affordable Care Act isn’t over GOP senators rally to McConnell's defense amid Trump attacks Sex trafficking bill would make the internet a wasteland MORE (R-Ohio), Sen. Marco RubioMarco RubioThe Memo: Trump tries to quiet race storm Trump tweets on trade, military, Alabama, but not Charlottesville Venezuelan leader put a hit on Marco Rubio: report MORE (R-Fla.), former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Rep. Paul RyanPaul RyanJuan Williams: Trump ought to thank Obama Democrats see ObamaCare leverage in spending fights Ryan: 'White supremacy is a scourge' MORE (R-Wis.), former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.), former Sen. Rick Santorum (R-Pa.) and even CIA Director David Petraeus are in “semi-protected” mode, preventing edits from unregistered users or users who registered within the last four days.

With anticipation high for the expected announcement by Romney’s campaign — which will come sometime this month, ahead of the GOP convention — TechPresident’s Micah L. Sifry on Monday reported that monitoring the increased number of edits on the Wikipedia entries for various contenders might tip off interested observers.

He based that speculation on the high number of edits made to Wikipedia pages for Sarah Palin and Joe BidenJoe BidenWhite House clarifies: We condemn all violence Biden criticizes Trump's 'many sides' remarks: 'There is only one side' Biden condemns Charlottesville violence: 'Racism and hate' have no place in US MORE ahead of announcements that they would be the running mates for Sen. John McCainJohn McCainMcCain defends McMaster from right-wing media attacks After ObamaCare repeal failure, look to the center Challenger’s super PAC accuses Flake of betraying voters in new ad MORE (R-Ariz.) and then-Sen. Barack ObamaBarack ObamaLook to Latinos to drive US economic growth Glimmer of hope in bipartisan criminal justice reform effort Sessions: Neo-Nazis 'attempting to legitimate themselves' MORE (D-Ill.), respectively. Palin’s page saw roughly 68 changes and Biden’s about 40 the day before their respective announcements, much higher numbers than other likely VP candidates at the time.

Numerous media outlets picked up the hypothesis, as did Comedy Central host Stephen Colbert on Tuesday night’s episode of “The Colbert Report.”

“So, nation, let your voice be heard in this historic decision,” Colbert urged his viewers. “Go on Wikipedia, and make as many edits as possible to your favorite VP contender."

Colbert’s advice and the media coverage apparently worked, as Sifry reported Wednesday that since Sunday, Portman's page has seen 112 edits, Rubio’s 52 and Pawlenty’s 18.

Pages for Sen. Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteRNC chair warns: Republicans who refused to back Trump offer 'cautionary tale' OPINION: Democracy will send ISIS to the same grave as communism Kelly Ayotte joins defense contractor's board of directors MORE (R-N.H.), Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell, Sen. John ThuneJohn ThuneGOP debates tax cuts vs. tax reform Trump turns on GOP Congress Lacking White House plan, Senate focuses on infrastructure MORE (R-S.D.) and New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez apparently were not vandalized and have not been locked down, although they appeared on what is believed to be the shortlist for Romney’s VP.

The Romney campaign plans to make its VP announcement through a mobile app and has encouraged interested parties to ensure they hear the news first by turning on the app’s push notifications.