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Rubio: Abortion rights arguments 'indefensible'

Sen. Marco Rubio (Fla.) underlined his opposition to abortion Friday, describing arguments used by those defending abortion rights as "truly indefensible."

"There is, indeed, a fundamental right to control your body. But there's another right: the right to life," Rubio said at the National Right to Life Convention in New Orleans, where he was joined by a number of Republican presidential candidates.

"Put another way, the child also has a right to his or her body," he said.

"What we have are two rights in conflict with one another. Yet immediately, the other side will say, 'Well, our right to choose is more important than the right of an embryo to live, because it's not a person,' " Rubio continued.

"If [an embryo] is not a person, what is it?" Rubio asked. "Because if you left it alone, that's the only thing it can become, a person. It cannot develop into a pony, for example."

Rubio has supported legislation prohibiting abortion after 20 weeks, except in cases of rape, incest or when the life of the mother is at stake, though Rubio didn't mention it in his speech.

"I rarely meet anyone who's willing to say they're pro-abortion. They'll say they're pro-choice. But almost everyone I've met told me they personally disagree with abortion. That alone tells us a little about the basic common sense the issue is based on," Rubio said.

"The White House needs an occupant who values and prioritizes life," he added. "I will bring advocacy to the White House, and we will get things done."

While Republicans have largely focused their rhetoric on issues such as jobs and the economy, the annual convention is an opportunity for them to tout their staunch anti-abortion positions.

"This is not a matter of debate; this is not a matter of faith; this is not a matter of belief," former Sen. Rick Santorum (Pa.), the 2012 GOP runner-up, said in a speech after Rubio.

"For a group of people that loves to talk to you about the 'science' and how the 'science is settled' ... on the most fundamental issue of science, life ... they refuse to accept science," Santorum said.

Other Republican candidates attending the conference this year included Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, former Texas Gov. Rick Perry and neurosurgeon Ben Carson, among others.

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