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The inauguration will be held on Monday, Jan. 21, coinciding with the Martin Luther King Jr. Day holiday. That's a day later than usual, the result of the traditional Inauguration Day — Jan. 20 — falling on a Sunday, and the second time the federal holiday has coincided with a presidential inauguration. Former President Clinton's second inauguration in 1997 also fell on the holiday.

The committee indicated that a tribute to African-Americans could play a role in the ceremony, noting that blacks began work on the Capitol Dome enslaved but finished the project as free laborers, thanks to the D.C. Emancipation Act enacted during the Civil War.

"The year 1863 was one of the most fateful in our nation’s history," the committee said in a statement. "It began with the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1st, and ended with a celebration of the new Capitol Dome crowned by the Statue of Freedom in December. It also was the year of the first homestead claim, the start of the first transcontinental railroad, the opening of the first land grant college, and President Lincoln’s historic and visionary Gettysburg Address."

The event's agenda is being coordinated by a special congressional committee, which includes much of the top leadership of both chambers. Appointed by the vice president and Speaker of the House, the group includes Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidChris Murphy’s profile rises with gun tragedies Republicans are headed for a disappointing end to their year in power Obama's HHS secretary could testify in Menendez trial MORE (D-Nev.) and Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderChildren’s health-care bill faces new obstacles Overnight Health Care: Schumer calls for tying ObamaCare fix to children's health insurance | Puerto Rico's water woes worsen | Dems plead for nursing home residents' right to sue Schumer calls for attaching ObamaCare fix to children's health insurance MORE (R-Tenn.), along with House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric CantorEric Cantor offering advice to end ‘immigration wars’ Trump's olive branch differs from the golden eras of bipartisanship After divisive rally, Trump calls for unity MORE (R-Va.) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.).