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The inauguration will be held on Monday, Jan. 21, coinciding with the Martin Luther King Jr. Day holiday. That's a day later than usual, the result of the traditional Inauguration Day — Jan. 20 — falling on a Sunday, and the second time the federal holiday has coincided with a presidential inauguration. Former President Clinton's second inauguration in 1997 also fell on the holiday.

The committee indicated that a tribute to African-Americans could play a role in the ceremony, noting that blacks began work on the Capitol Dome enslaved but finished the project as free laborers, thanks to the D.C. Emancipation Act enacted during the Civil War.

"The year 1863 was one of the most fateful in our nation’s history," the committee said in a statement. "It began with the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1st, and ended with a celebration of the new Capitol Dome crowned by the Statue of Freedom in December. It also was the year of the first homestead claim, the start of the first transcontinental railroad, the opening of the first land grant college, and President Lincoln’s historic and visionary Gettysburg Address."

The event's agenda is being coordinated by a special congressional committee, which includes much of the top leadership of both chambers. Appointed by the vice president and Speaker of the House, the group includes Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidSenate GOP breaks record on confirming Trump picks for key court Don’t worry (too much) about Kavanaugh changing the Supreme Court Dem infighting erupts over Supreme Court pick MORE (D-Nev.) and Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderMontana governor raises profile ahead of potential 2020 bid Dems pressure GOP to take legal action supporting pre-existing conditions Trump administration to explore importing prescription drugs MORE (R-Tenn.), along with House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric Ivan CantorDave Brat's seat moved to 'toss-up' 4 years after upset victory over Eric Cantor The animating forces behind the Democratic Party are true, radical leftists Divided Democrats are in danger MORE (R-Va.) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.).