Under pressure from lawmakers, the Department of Agriculture (USDA) has changed its school lunch requirements to allow more meats and grains.

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Several farm-state senators from both parties had been pushing USDA to change its school lunch requirements, saying it left some students hungry and schools dealing with extra paperwork to comply with the regulations.

In a statement Saturday, Senator John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenGOP lawmakers want Trump to stop bashing Congress Chao names participants selected for drone pilot program Lobbying World MORE’s (R-N.D.) office said USDA informed him in a letter on Friday that it lifted its limitations on intake of grains, starches and protein.

“I’m grateful to [Agriculture] Secretary [Tom] Vilsack for recognizing that the rules need to allow for individual differences among children and the prerogatives of local school districts, and resources available to them,” Hoeven said in a statement.

Nevertheless, USDA’s modifications to the requirements are temporary and only apply to this current school year. Hoeven said he wants the changes to be made permanent.

“While we welcome this news from USDA, we believe the new flexibility should be permanent, rather than for just the 2012-2013 school year, and we will continue to press that case,” Hoeven said.

Hoeven said the response came from a letter that he and Sen. Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (D-Ark.) sent to USDA last month. Other senators who signed on to the letter include James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeOvernight Energy: EPA moves to roll back chemical plant safety rule | NASA chief says humans contribute to climate change | Pruitt gets outside lawyer House lawmakers to unveil water resources bill on Friday North Korea’s threat casts doubt on Trump-Kim nuclear summit MORE (R-Okla.), Kent Conrad (D-N.D.), Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziSinger Jason Mraz: Too much political 'combat' in Washington Lobbying world Ethics watchdog calls for probe into Mulvaney over 'real estate dealings' MORE (R-Wyo.), Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterOvernight Defense: Over 500 amendments proposed for defense bill | Measures address transgender troops, Yemen war | Trump taps acting VA chief as permanent secretary Not only do we need to support veterans, but their caregivers, too Trump Jr. prepares to hit the campaign trail ahead of midterms MORE (D-Mont.), John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneHillicon Valley: Lawmakers target Chinese tech giants | Dems move to save top cyber post | Trump gets a new CIA chief | Ryan delays election security briefing | Twitter CEO meets lawmakers Twitter CEO meets with lawmakers to talk net neutrality, privacy Senate votes to save net neutrality rules MORE (R-S.D.), John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoWatchdog to probe EPA email preservation Overnight Energy: EPA moves to roll back chemical plant safety rule | NASA chief says humans contribute to climate change | Pruitt gets outside lawyer House lawmakers to unveil water resources bill on Friday MORE (R-Wyo.), Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranGOP senator’s defense of Tester counters Trump attacks GOP more confident about W. Va. Senate as Blankenship fades Senators hope Trump's next VA pick will be less controversial MORE (R-Kans.), Dan Coates (R-Ind.) and Tim JohnsonTimothy (Tim) Peter JohnsonSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Court ruling could be game changer for Dems in Nevada Bank lobbyists counting down to Shelby’s exit MORE (D-S.D.).

Others praised the move by USDA. In a statement Friday, Tester said this will give schools more flexibility.

“Schools need flexibility to make sure kids get the nutrition they need to focus on their studies. I appreciate USDA's willingness to listen to Montana parents, teachers, and administrators and look forward to working with USDA to adjust these new guidelines so they work for all of our kids,” Tester said.

This isn’t the first time Capitol Hill has bristled at the USDA school lunch requirements. Last year, Congress blocked several of the department’s requirements, including limiting potatoes and not classifying tomato paste on a pizza as a vegetable.