A plurality of voters approve of President Obama’s handling of the “fiscal cliff” negotiations, while a strong majority disapprove of the job Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerLobbying World Freedom Caucus wants budget reforms attached to debt limit increase Trey Gowdy announces retirement from Congress MORE (R-Ohio) has done, according to a new poll.


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Forty-seven percent said they approve of the way Obama has handled the talks to reach a deficit-reduction agreement, against 46 percent who said they disapprove, a BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerLobbying World Freedom Caucus wants budget reforms attached to debt limit increase Trey Gowdy announces retirement from Congress MORE-getting-bad-reviews-on-fiscal-cliff-talks/" href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/wp/2012/12/12/john-boehner-getting-bad-reviews-on-fiscal-cliff-talks/">Washington Post-ABC News poll released Wednesday finds. Only 24 percent said they approve of the job Boehner has done, compared to 54 percent who disapprove.

Obama has overwhelming support from his own party, with 79 percent of Democrats saying they approve, against 15 percent who disapprove. Boehner, conversely, is barely above water within his party, with 39 percent saying they approve and 37 percent saying they disapprove.

While Boehner has been backed by GOP leadership in the negotiations — House Budget Committee Chairman and GOP vice presidential candidate Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanMcConnell: 'Whoever gets to 60 wins' on immigration Overnight Defense: Latest on spending fight - House passes stopgap with defense money while Senate nears two-year budget deal | Pentagon planning military parade for Trump | Afghan war will cost B in 2018 House passes stopgap spending measure with defense money MORE (R-Wis.) and House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric Ivan Cantor'Release the memo' — let's stop pretending that Democrats are the defenders of the FBI Raúl Labrador, a model for Hispanic politicians reaching higher Eric Cantor: Moore ‘deserves to lose’ MORE (R-Va.) both signed his first proposal to the White House — Boehner continues to struggle with some Tea Party conservatives who are urging him not to budge on higher tax rates.

Boehner's initial deficit offer to the White House included $800 billion in new tax revenues, but the Speaker is resisting Obama's push to raise tax rates on the wealthiest 2 percent.

Boehner has also been criticized recently by some in his party for his decision to strip four members — Reps. Justin AmashJustin AmashOvernight Defense: House votes to renew surveillance program | More drones, troops headed to Afghanistan | Former officers urge lawmakers to curb Trump's nuclear powers Overnight Tech: House votes to reauthorize surveillance powers | Twitter on defensive after Project Veritas video | Senate panel to hold hearing on bitcoin Overnight Cybersecurity: House votes to renew NSA spying | Trump tweets spark confusion | Signs Russian hackers are targeting Olympics | Bannon expected to appear before House Intel panel MORE (R-Mich.), Walter Jones (R-N.C.), David SchweikertDavid SchweikertFive obstacles to Trump's infrastructure ambitions The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on tax-reform bill GOP Senate hopeful Kelli Ward leads challengers in internal poll MORE (R-Ariz.) and Tim Huelskamp (R-Kan.) — of high-profile committee assignments.


The move triggered opposition from outside conservative groups that have undertaken efforts to replace Boehner as Speaker. But those calls have not received support from within the caucus.

While Amash has said he might not back Boehner to retain the gavel, Reps. Tom Cole (R-Okla.) and Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnGOP Senate candidate fundraising lags behind Dems in key races Overnight Tech: Official resigns, employee fired over Hawaii fake missile alert | Employee thought drill was real attack | Amazon teams up to cut health costs | Feds subpoena major bitcoin exchange House lawmakers clash over broadband infrastructure MORE (R-Tenn.) on Sunday confidently predicted he would remain Speaker.