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Clinton is the runaway favorite among Democrats, with 57 percent saying they want her as the party's nominee. Vice President Biden comes in a distant second at 16 percent, followed by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenGovernment watchdog finds safety gaps in assisted living homes David Crosby: Shared dislike for Trump could reunite Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young Dem senators tell Trump he doesn’t have ‘legal authority’ to launch preemptive strike on North Korea MORE (D-Mass.) at 4 percent each. Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley pulls 3 percent support among party supporters, with Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick and Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerRegulators push for 'coordinated' approach to bitcoin trading House funding bill includes bipartisan Medicare reforms Overnight Tech: Mulvaney reportedly froze Equifax hack probe | Dems want new restrictions on Comcast-NBC | NJ gov signs net neutrality order | Senate confirms patent chief MORE (D-Va.) each at 2, and Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandBritish health secretary fires back at Trump over universal health care claims Trump on Dems’ ‘universal' health-care push: ‘No thanks’ Gillibrand calls for DOJ to investigate US Olympic Committee over abuse scandal MORE (D-N.Y.) and Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer winning 1 percent each.

Clinton is retiring from her position in President Obama's Cabinet, and has tried to temper expectations that she'd be open to running in 2016. However, after failing to gain the nomination in 2008, her performance as secretary of State has boosted her profile, and many in both parties believe she would be a formidable presidential candidate.

In December, former Speaker and presidential candidate Newt Gingrich (R) said the Republican Party in its current form was “incapable” of beating her if she's the Democratic nominee in 2016.

On the Republican side, the field is far more competitive. Rubio leads with 21 percent support, followed by former vice presidential candidate Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanMcConnell: 'Whoever gets to 60 wins' on immigration Overnight Defense: Latest on spending fight - House passes stopgap with defense money while Senate nears two-year budget deal | Pentagon planning military parade for Trump | Afghan war will cost B in 2018 House passes stopgap spending measure with defense money MORE (R-Wis.) at 16. Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee holds 15 percent support, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush tied at 14, Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulPentagon: War in Afghanistan will cost billion in 2018 Overnight Finance: Senators near two-year budget deal | Trump would 'love to see a shutdown' over immigration | Dow closes nearly 600 points higher after volatile day | Trade deficit at highest level since 2008 | Pawlenty leaving Wall Street group Rand Paul calls for punishment if Congress can't reach a long-term budget deal MORE (R-Ky.) at 5, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal at 3, and Govs. Rick Perry (Texas) and Susana Martinez (New Mexico) each taking 2.

Rubio's recent schedule — a stop in Iowa, the first caucus state, and a high-profile interview with GQ magazine — has many Republicans hopeful that he's gearing up for a run.

However, Clinton trounces Rubio, Ryan and Bush in head to head match-ups, according to the early PPP survey, besting each by 14 percentage points.

The most competitive Republican against Clinton right now is Christie, according to the poll, who trails Clinton 44 to 42.

But Christie has infuriated some on the right recently after praising Obama for the federal response to Hurricane Sandy in the final days of the 2012 campaign, and then bashing congressional Republicans after Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerLobbying World Freedom Caucus wants budget reforms attached to debt limit increase Trey Gowdy announces retirement from Congress MORE (R-Ohio) pulled a vote on a bill to provide aid to victims of the storm.

Christie's favorability with Republican voters is among the lowest of any of the candidates at 44 positive and 29 negative.