ADVERTISEMENT
Clinton is the runaway favorite among Democrats, with 57 percent saying they want her as the party's nominee. Vice President Biden comes in a distant second at 16 percent, followed by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren goes on tweetstorm over GOP ObamaCare repeal bill Warren: Dems should campaign on single-payer healthcare plan Senate Dems step up protests ahead of ObamaCare repeal vote MORE (D-Mass.) at 4 percent each. Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley pulls 3 percent support among party supporters, with Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick and Sen. Mark WarnerMark WarnerOur national parks need updates; Congress can help Overnight Cybersecurity: New questions about 'ransomware' attack | Tensions between NSA chief, Trump over Russia | Senate panel asks states to publicize election hacks Senate panel to get Comey memos: report MORE (D-Va.) each at 2, and Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandSenate Democrats: ObamaCare repeal fight isn't over yet Bipartisan senators seek to boost expertise in military justice system Mattis gaining power in Trump’s Cabinet MORE (D-N.Y.) and Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer winning 1 percent each.

Clinton is retiring from her position in President Obama's Cabinet, and has tried to temper expectations that she'd be open to running in 2016. However, after failing to gain the nomination in 2008, her performance as secretary of State has boosted her profile, and many in both parties believe she would be a formidable presidential candidate.

In December, former Speaker and presidential candidate Newt Gingrich (R) said the Republican Party in its current form was “incapable” of beating her if she's the Democratic nominee in 2016.

On the Republican side, the field is far more competitive. Rubio leads with 21 percent support, followed by former vice presidential candidate Rep. Paul RyanPaul RyanTougher Russia sanctions bill facing another setback CNN's Kohn, Ben Shapiro in Twitter spat after controversial 'killing spree' Ryan tweet Ryan: 'Prayers are being answered' for Scalise's recovery MORE (R-Wis.) at 16. Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee holds 15 percent support, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush tied at 14, Sen. Rand PaulRand PaulHealthcare wish lists: What moderates, conservatives want GOP infighting erupts over healthcare bill GOP senator on resolving healthcare differences: 'Even porcupines make love' MORE (R-Ky.) at 5, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal at 3, and Govs. Rick Perry (Texas) and Susana Martinez (New Mexico) each taking 2.

Rubio's recent schedule — a stop in Iowa, the first caucus state, and a high-profile interview with GQ magazine — has many Republicans hopeful that he's gearing up for a run.

However, Clinton trounces Rubio, Ryan and Bush in head to head match-ups, according to the early PPP survey, besting each by 14 percentage points.

The most competitive Republican against Clinton right now is Christie, according to the poll, who trails Clinton 44 to 42.

But Christie has infuriated some on the right recently after praising Obama for the federal response to Hurricane Sandy in the final days of the 2012 campaign, and then bashing congressional Republicans after Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerChaffetz calls for ,500 legislator housing stipend GOP super-PAC promises big spending in 2018 Ryan reminds lawmakers to be on time for votes MORE (R-Ohio) pulled a vote on a bill to provide aid to victims of the storm.

Christie's favorability with Republican voters is among the lowest of any of the candidates at 44 positive and 29 negative.