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Clinton is the runaway favorite among Democrats, with 57 percent saying they want her as the party's nominee. Vice President Biden comes in a distant second at 16 percent, followed by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenDem senators demand Trump explain ties to Koch brothers 'Fearless Girl' statue to be moved away from Wall Street bull Sanders, Warren, O’Rourke inspire patriotic small donor waves MORE (D-Mass.) at 4 percent each. Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley pulls 3 percent support among party supporters, with Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick and Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerHeitkamp becomes first Dem to back Pompeo for secretary of State Dems walk tightrope on Pompeo nomination Amid struggle for votes, GOP plows ahead with Cabinet picks MORE (D-Va.) each at 2, and Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandSchumer to introduce bill to decriminalize marijuana Navy, Marines chiefs say no morale issues with transgender troops Dem senators call on FCC to protect against robocalls MORE (D-N.Y.) and Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer winning 1 percent each.

Clinton is retiring from her position in President Obama's Cabinet, and has tried to temper expectations that she'd be open to running in 2016. However, after failing to gain the nomination in 2008, her performance as secretary of State has boosted her profile, and many in both parties believe she would be a formidable presidential candidate.

In December, former Speaker and presidential candidate Newt Gingrich (R) said the Republican Party in its current form was “incapable” of beating her if she's the Democratic nominee in 2016.

On the Republican side, the field is far more competitive. Rubio leads with 21 percent support, followed by former vice presidential candidate Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanA warning to Ryan’s successor: The Speakership is no cakewalk Republicans divided over legislation protecting Mueller The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (R-Wis.) at 16. Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee holds 15 percent support, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush tied at 14, Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulOvernight Defense: Congress poised for busy week on nominations, defense bill | Trump to deliver Naval Academy commencement speech | Trump administration appeals decision to block suspected combatant's transfer Democrats mull audacious play to block Pompeo Overnight Defense: Trump steps up fight with California over guard deployment | Heitkamp is first Dem to back Pompeo for State | Dems question legality of Syria strikes MORE (R-Ky.) at 5, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal at 3, and Govs. Rick Perry (Texas) and Susana Martinez (New Mexico) each taking 2.

Rubio's recent schedule — a stop in Iowa, the first caucus state, and a high-profile interview with GQ magazine — has many Republicans hopeful that he's gearing up for a run.

However, Clinton trounces Rubio, Ryan and Bush in head to head match-ups, according to the early PPP survey, besting each by 14 percentage points.

The most competitive Republican against Clinton right now is Christie, according to the poll, who trails Clinton 44 to 42.

But Christie has infuriated some on the right recently after praising Obama for the federal response to Hurricane Sandy in the final days of the 2012 campaign, and then bashing congressional Republicans after Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerA warning to Ryan’s successor: The Speakership is no cakewalk With Ryan out, let’s blow up the process for selecting the next Speaker Race for Republican Speaker rare chance to unify party for election MORE (R-Ohio) pulled a vote on a bill to provide aid to victims of the storm.

Christie's favorability with Republican voters is among the lowest of any of the candidates at 44 positive and 29 negative.