President Obama in an interview broadcast early Tuesday rejected legislation allowing victims of the 9/11 terrorist attacks to sue Saudi Arabia’s government, saying it would expose the U.S. to endless lawsuits.

“This is a matter of how ... the United States approaches our interactions with other countries,” he told host Charlie Rose on "CBS This Morning."

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“If we open up the possibility that individuals and the United States can routinely start suing other governments, then we are also opening up the United States to being continually sued by individuals in other countries.”

The bill, called the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act, would allow families of the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and other attacks to sue nations that support terrorism.

Sens. John CornynJohn CornynArchivist rejects Democrats' demand for Kavanaugh documents Senate Judiciary announces Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing Reining in UN’s little known International Telecommunication Union MORE (R-Texas) and Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerSenate Democrats should stop playing politics on Kavanaugh Montana GOP Senate hopeful touts Trump's support in new ad Strong job growth drives home choice for voters this election MORE (D-N.Y.) authored the measure, arguing it would let 9/11 victims pursue recourse against Qatar and Saudi Arabia for supporting groups like al Qaeda.

Democratic presidential primary rivals Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillicon Valley: FBI fires Strzok after anti-Trump tweets | Trump signs defense bill with cyber war policy | Google under scrutiny over location data | Sinclair's troubles may just be beginning | Tech to ease health data access | Netflix CFO to step down Signs grow that Mueller is zeroing in on Roger Stone Omarosa claims president called Trump Jr. a 'f--- up' for releasing Trump Tower emails MORE and Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersOvernight Health Care: States fight Trump on non-ObamaCare plans | Analysis looks into surprise medical bills | Left hits industry group working against single payer Overnight Energy: Trump Cabinet officials head west | Zinke says California fires are not 'a debate about climate change' | Perry tours North Dakota coal mine | EPA chief meets industry leaders in Iowa to discuss ethanol mandate Sen. Sanders blasts Zinke: Wildfires 'have everything to do with climate change' MORE (I-Vt.) have both endorsed the legislation.

“Wherever the trail may lead, it should be followed,” said Clinton, the Democratic presidential front-runner, on WABC radio. "We need justice.”

Lawmakers are now pressuring Obama to release 28 pages of the 9/11 report that are rumored to link Saudi Arabia to the attacks but were redacted upon release.

Obama on CBS said that a review of the controversial documents is ongoing and likely concluding soon.

“I have a sense of what’s in there,” he told Rose. "But this has been a process which we generally reveal with through the intelligence community and Jim Clapper, our director of National Intelligence, has been going through to make sure that whatever it is that is released is not going ot compromise some major national security interest of the United States. My understanding is that he’s about to complete that process."