Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpConservatives express concern over House GOP immigration bill Poll: McSally holds 14-point lead in Arizona GOP Senate primary Trump defends Nielsen amid criticism over family separations MORE on Wednesday fired back at his GOP critics, bragging that he expects to win two terms in the White House.
 
Asked on NBC's "Today" show whether he was confident he could unite the party, Trump responded, "I am confident that I can unite much of it. Some of it I don't want.
 
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"There were statements made about me — those people can go away and maybe come back in eight years after we serve two terms," he added. "Honestly, there are some people I really don't want."
 
Trump's remarks came after the interview began with clips of former rivals, including Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamOvernight Health Care — Presented by the Association of American Medical Colleges — Trump officials move to expand non-ObamaCare health plans | 'Zero tolerance' policy stirs fears in health community | New ObamaCare repeal plan McCain, Coons: Trump should withdraw controversial refugee nominee GOP senators drafting legislation to keep immigrant families together MORE, Jeb Bush, Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioDem scores upset over Republican in Florida county commissioner race GOP senators introduce bill to prevent family separations at border McCain, Coons: Trump should withdraw controversial refugee nominee MORE, Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzConservatives express concern over House GOP immigration bill GOP senators introduce bill to prevent family separations at border Senate GOP tries to defuse Trump border crisis MORE and Carly Fiorina, predicting he would not become the Republican nominee.
 
Trump clinched the title of presumptive GOP nominee with a win over Cruz in the Indiana primary on Tuesday, forcing the Texas senator to suspend his campaign.
 
Trump's win in Indiana puts him on a clear path toward the nomination, with 1,047 delegates, according to The Associated Press. He needs 1,237 to clinch the nomination; without Cruz in the race, he is all but guaranteed to hit that number.