President Obama and Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump adds to legal team after attacks on Mueller Press: You can’t believe a word he says Feehery: March Madness MORE will appear together in their first joint interview this weekend.

The president and Clinton, who is expected to leave the State Department within days, will tape the interview Friday at the White House with "60 Minutes" anchor Steve Kroft. It will be the president's first dual interview with anyone other than first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaTrump celebrates St. Patrick's day on Twitter Michelle Obama’s advice to girls: 'Do not be afraid to fail' Melania Trump to present award in honor of International Women's Day MORE.

Obama and Clinton forged a strong working relationship over the past four years — and former President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonCourt questions greens’ challenge to EPA chemical rule delay The only way out of this mess Federal court tosses out Obama-era rule requiring financial advisers to act in customers' best interests MORE played a vital role in Obama's reelection campaign last fall. But Obama and Clinton were also bitter rivals during the 2008 Democratic presidential primaries. 

The joint interview comes just after Clinton testified before House and Senate panels regarding the administration's response to the terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya. Republicans have been highly critical of the White House's handling of the attack. They argue that early comments made by United Nations Ambassador Susan Rice, which suggested the violence was the result of a protest over an anti-Islam video, amounted to a cover-up.

On Wednesday, Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonSenate GOP shoots down bill blocking Trump tariffs Possible North Korea summit raises anxiety in Washington Wisconsin Republican would sign on to bill to nullify Trump tariffs MORE (R-Wis.) accused Rice of “purposely misleading the American public” about the events preceding the attacks.

That provoked a fiery and emotional response from Clinton.

"The fact is we had four dead Americans. Was it because of a protest? Or was it because of guys out for a walk one night who decided they'd go kill some Americans? What difference, at this point, does it make?" Clinton said.

White House press secretary Jay Carney later defended Clinton's comments, saying the secretary was referring to "an obvious political obsession over a series of talking points that again bears no relevance on the central issues" around the Sept. 11, 2012, attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi.