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Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) reintroduced the bill, the Uniting American Families Act, on Tuesday. The legislation is co-sponsored by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.), Reps. Richard Hanna (R-N.Y.), Luis Gutiérrez (D-Ill.), Charlie Dent (R-Pa.), Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.), John Conyers (D-Mich.), Jared Polis (D-Colo.), David Cicilline (D-R.I.), Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.), Mark PocanMark William PocanThe curious case of Andrew McCabe's legal defense fund Moderates see vindication in Lipinski’s primary win DeVos battles lawmakers in contentious hearing MORE (D-Wis.), Mark Takano (D-Calif.), Sean Maloney (D-N.Y.), Mike Honda (D-Calif.), and Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.).

Currently, only immigrants in heterosexual marriages can sponsor their spouses for legal residency. The Uniting American Families Act (UAFA) would include the term "permanent partner" in the Immigration and Naturalization Act in order to include immigrants in same-sex relationships. The same benefits and penalties applied to heterosexual marriages would apply to same-sex marriages under the legislation.

Sen. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyCongress should build on the momentum from spending bill Overnight Tech: Zuckerberg grilled by lawmakers over data scandal | What we learned from marathon hearing | Facebook hit with class action lawsuit | Twitter endorses political ad disclosure bill | Uber buys bike share Overnight Cybersecurity: Zuckerberg faces grilling in marathon hearing | What we learned from Facebook chief | Dems press Ryan to help get Russia hacking records | Top Trump security adviser resigning MORE (D-Vt.), the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, plans to introduce a companion bill in his chamber.

"Today, thousands of committed same-sex couples are needlessly suffering because of unequal treatment under our immigration laws, and this is an outrage," Nadler said in a statement.

Legislators are also working to pass a larger immigration reform bill. A secretive bipartisan group of House members, which includes Lofgren and Gutierrez, plans on introducing an immigration reform bill soon. In late January, a bipartisan group of four Democrats and four Republicans in the Senate introduced a framework for reform.

"As we work toward comprehensive immigration reform, we must ensure that the value of all families is valued, respected and recognized in the eyes of the law," Pelosi said in a statement.

Conyers said under the current immigration reform system, couples in same-sex marriages "don't count."

"Our immigration system has always recognized the value of keeping families together," Conyers said in the statement announcing the bill. "But when it comes to legally married same-sex couples and domestic partners our immigration law says those families don’t count. I am pleased to join my colleagues today to stand against this discrimination and to protect the unity of all families."

Conspicuously, a number of members of the House's LGBT Equality Caucus have not signed onto the bill, including Reps. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.) and Xavier BecerraXavier BecerraTrump's EPA quietly revamps rules for air pollution Flurry of lawsuits filed over citizenship question on census Trump continues to put Americans first by adding citizenship question to census MORE (D-Calif.). Becerra, Gutierrez, and Lofgren are members of the House immigration reform group.

Same-sex marriage provisions in a new immigration reform bill will likely be a sticking point as Congress moves a forward with immigration reform. President Obama recently signaled that he would include measures for same-sex couples in pushing immigration reform. Meanwhile, Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamOvernight Cybersecurity: Senators eye path forward on election security bill | Facebook isn't winning over privacy advocates | New hacks target health care Paul backs Pompeo, clearing path for confirmation Can Silicon Valley expect European-style regulation here at home? MORE (R-S.C.), one of the eight senators who produced the framework, called it a mistake for Obama to include provisions for same-sex couples.

"Why don't we just put legalized abortion in there and round it all out," Graham said, according to the Huffington Post.