NRA blames 'political correctness' for Orlando shooting
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The National Rifle Association (NRA) on Tuesday defended gun rights, two days after a gunman killed 49 people and left 53 others injured at a gay nightclub in Orlando.

"In the aftermath of this terrorist attack, President Obama and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDHS secretary: No sign Russia targeting midterm elections at 2016 level Twitter suspends Guccifer 2.0 and DCLeaks accounts after indictments Elon Musk donated nearly K to Republican PAC, filings show MORE renewed calls for more gun control, including a ban on whole categories of semi-automatic firearms," Chris Cox, executive director of the NRA Institute for Legislative Action, wrote in a USA Today op-ed.

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"They are desperate to create the illusion that they’re doing something to protect us because their policies can’t and won’t keep us safe. This transparent head-fake should scare every American, because it will do nothing to prevent the next attack," he said.

Cox said "political correctness" allowed for the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history to take place, noting that the FBI had interviewed the shooter multiple times since 2013 and that he maintained a government-approved security license.

"Unfortunately, the Obama administration’s political correctness prevented anything from being done about it," Cox wrote.

Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpReporters defend CNN's Acosta after White House says he 'disrespected' Trump with question Security costs of Trump visit to Scotland sparks outrage among Scottish citizens Ex-CIA officer: Prosecution of Russians indicted for DNC hack 'ain't ever going to happen' MORE, who the NRA has endorsed, also attacked "political correctness" in a speech following the shooting.

Democrats have renewed calls for gun control followed the attack early Sunday. The gunman used a pistol and an assault-style rifle.

Federal officials are investigating the case for any international terrorism ties but have so far called it an act of domestic terrorism, saying the gunman claimed an affinity for Islamic militant groups.

"Radical Islamic terrorists are not deterred by gun control laws," Cox wrote Tuesday, pointing to attacks in San Bernardino, Calif., Paris and Brussels.