Sens. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyNSA spying program overcomes key Senate hurdle McConnell to Dems: Don't hold government 'hostage' over DACA Nielsen acknowledges Trump used 'tough language' in immigration meeting MORE (D-Vt.) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsDemocrats search for 51st net neutrality vote Overnight Tech: States sue FCC over net neutrality repeal | Senate Dems reach 50 votes on measure to override repeal | Dems press Apple on phone slowdowns, kids' health | New Android malware found Overnight Regulation: Dems claim 50 votes in Senate to block net neutrality repeal | Consumer bureau takes first step to revising payday lending rule | Trump wants to loosen rules on bank loans | Pentagon, FDA to speed up military drug approvals MORE (R-Maine) will unveil legislation on Monday aimed at curbing the illegal trafficking of firearms.

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Collins’s spokesman Kevin Kelley told The Hill in an email that details about the bill were coming “shortly.” 

It’s unclear how the legislation would differ from Leahy’s previously introduced bill which would make it easier for federal law enforcement officials to crack down on so-called “straw purchasers.” 

But the news that Collins is on board with Leahy’s effort is the latest evidence of a growing bipartisan consensus to take at least some steps to stem the nation’s epidemic of gun violence.

Leahy’s earlier bill would add a new provision to the criminal code to make it illegal to purchase firearms on behalf of persons who are prohibited from owning them. Federal prosecutors now have little legal basis to file charges against gun traffickers and often must rely on technical paperwork violations to build their cases.

Last week, the Senate Judiciary Committee was scheduled to mark up Leahy’s legislation, Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinDHS chief takes heat over Trump furor NSA spying program overcomes key Senate hurdle Democrats will need to explain if they shut government down over illegal immigration MORE’s (D-Calif.) renewal of the federal assault weapons ban, a measure introduced by Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerDems face hard choice for State of the Union response Billionaire Steyer to push for Dem House push Billionaire Steyer announces million for Dem House push MORE (D-Calif.) to increase federal grants for school safety, and Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerDemocrats will need to explain if they shut government down over illegal immigration White House: Trump remarks didn't derail shutdown talks Schumer defends Durbin after GOP senator questions account of Trump meeting MORE’s (D-N.Y.) bill to expand background checks on private gun sales.

The mark-up was delayed until this week, to give Schumer more time to work out a deal with Republicans, who say expanded background checks can’t include any semblance of a national registry to track gun purchases.

Lawmakers have resumed debate over gun control in the aftermath of December’s tragic shooting at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn.

While President Obama is pushing for bans on assault weapons and high-capacity clips as well as mandatory background checks, it is uncertain which of these measures can pass. The nation’s gun lobby and GOP lawmakers have vowed to wage a fierce fight against any new gun ownership restrictions.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidDems search for winning playbook Dems face hard choice for State of the Union response The Memo: Immigration battle tests activists’ muscle MORE (D-Nev.) has said however that he would allow a floor vote on any legislation which passes through committee. And on Sunday, Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerDems face hard choice for State of the Union response Even some conservatives seem open to return to earmarks Overnight Finance: Trump, lawmakers take key step to immigration deal | Trump urges Congress to bring back earmarks | Tax law poised to create windfall for states | Trump to attend Davos | Dimon walks back bitcoin criticism MORE (R-Ohio) said the House would consider any gun-control measures passed by the Senate.