Sens. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyMcConnell sets 'minibus' strategy for 2019 spending Dem senator mocks Pruitt over alleged security threats: 'Nobody even knows who you are' Pruitt tells senators: ‘I share your concerns about some of these decisions’ MORE (D-Vt.) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — VA reform bill heads to Trump's desk Senate panel to consider ban on prescription drug 'gag clauses' Pressure rising on GOP after Trump–DOJ fight’s latest turn MORE (R-Maine) will unveil legislation on Monday aimed at curbing the illegal trafficking of firearms.

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Collins’s spokesman Kevin Kelley told The Hill in an email that details about the bill were coming “shortly.” 

It’s unclear how the legislation would differ from Leahy’s previously introduced bill which would make it easier for federal law enforcement officials to crack down on so-called “straw purchasers.” 

But the news that Collins is on board with Leahy’s effort is the latest evidence of a growing bipartisan consensus to take at least some steps to stem the nation’s epidemic of gun violence.

Leahy’s earlier bill would add a new provision to the criminal code to make it illegal to purchase firearms on behalf of persons who are prohibited from owning them. Federal prosecutors now have little legal basis to file charges against gun traffickers and often must rely on technical paperwork violations to build their cases.

Last week, the Senate Judiciary Committee was scheduled to mark up Leahy’s legislation, Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinFormer US attorneys urge support for Trump nominee The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — Republicans see some daylight in midterm polling Senate panel clears bill to bolster probes of foreign investment deals MORE’s (D-Calif.) renewal of the federal assault weapons ban, a measure introduced by Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerThe ‘bang for the buck’ theory fueling Trump’s infrastructure plan Kamala Harris endorses Gavin Newsom for California governor Dems face hard choice for State of the Union response MORE (D-Calif.) to increase federal grants for school safety, and Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — GOP centrists in striking distance of immigration vote Schumer: Trump should take Kim Jong Un off 'trip coin' Overnight Finance: Trump signs repeal of auto-loan policy | Justices uphold contracts that bar employee class-action suits | US, China trade war 'on hold' MORE’s (D-N.Y.) bill to expand background checks on private gun sales.

The mark-up was delayed until this week, to give Schumer more time to work out a deal with Republicans, who say expanded background checks can’t include any semblance of a national registry to track gun purchases.

Lawmakers have resumed debate over gun control in the aftermath of December’s tragic shooting at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn.

While President Obama is pushing for bans on assault weapons and high-capacity clips as well as mandatory background checks, it is uncertain which of these measures can pass. The nation’s gun lobby and GOP lawmakers have vowed to wage a fierce fight against any new gun ownership restrictions.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidMcConnell not yet ready to change rules for Trump nominees The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by CVS Health — Trump’s love-hate relationship with the Senate Trump to press GOP on changing Senate rules MORE (D-Nev.) has said however that he would allow a floor vote on any legislation which passes through committee. And on Sunday, Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerJim Jordan as Speaker is change America needs to move forward Paul Ryan’s political purgatory Republicans fear retribution for joining immigration revolt MORE (R-Ohio) said the House would consider any gun-control measures passed by the Senate.