Patricia Smith — the mother of Sean Smith, who was killed in the 2012 terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya — delivered a raw, emotional and unapologetic speech at the Republican National Convention on Monday that centered on one person: Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonChris Murphy’s profile rises with gun tragedies DNC, RNC step up cyber protections Gun proposal picks up GOP support MORE.

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"For all of this loss, for all of this grief, for all of the cynicism, the tragedy in Benghazi has wrought upon America, I blame Hillary Clinton," Smith declared from the convention stage in Cleveland. "I blame Hillary Clinton personally for the death of my son."

Smith went on to call Clinton, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, a liar for her explanation of Smith’s death. 

"In an email to her daughter shortly after the attack, Hillary Clinton blamed it on terrorism," said Smith. "But when I saw Hillary Clinton at Sean’s coffin ceremony, just days later, she looked me squarely in the eye and told me a video was responsible. Since then, I have repeatedly asked Hillary Clinton to explain to me the real reason why my son is dead. I’m still waiting."

MSNBC's Chris Matthews was asked for his reaction to the speech during the network's convention coverage and didn't hold anything back. 

"I don't understand why the Republicans would choose to put this on prime-time television when they have such wonderful stories of American heroism to speak to the American people," an emotional Matthews said. "I think it was wrong.

"I don't care what that woman up there, the mother, has felt. Her emotions are her own. But for the country in choosing a leader, it's wrong to have someone get up there and tell a lie about Hillary Clinton. It's not true. It's logically not true. I think it's wrong that they ruined their evening with this." 

The first night of the Republican National Convention is only an hour old in prime time. 

Next week's Democratic National Convention will feature the mothers of Trayvon Martin and Eric Garner, two black men whose deaths sparked a national debate over racial profiling by police.

And already there are major fireworks on the cable news front sure to be debated tomorrow.