Former Obama campaign strategist David Axelrod argued that Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRubio: McCabe 'should've been allowed to finish through the weekend' For Tillerson, bucking Trump became a job-killer At least six dead after pedestrian bridge collapses on cars in Florida MORE (R-Fla.) has to walk a fine line to win both the Republican nomination for president and the general election if he decides to run in 2016.

Axelrod, speaking in an interview with the left-leaning Juncture magazine, cited Rubio's decision to vote against reauthorizing the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).

"I recently saw the Hispanic Republican senator, Marco Rubio, on television," Axelrod said in the interview, released Friday. "Earlier that day he had been one of the 20 to vote against the Violence Against Women Act in the Senate. It is hard for me to see how someone gets elected as the president of the United States making those votes, but also hard for me to see how someone wins the Republican nomination without making those votes."

Rubio was one of 22 Republican senators that voted against the VAWA reauthorization in February. Rubio objected to the final bill because, he said, it "would mandate the diversion of a portion of funding from domestic violence programs to sexual assault programs, although there’s no evidence to suggest this shift will result in a greater number of convictions."

Rubio has been active in supporting causes supported both by Tea Party Republicans as well as working on bipartisan initiatives. The senator from Florida recently joined in Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulTrump informally offered Cohn CIA job before changing his mind: report Congress moving to end US involvement in Yemen Congress races to finish .2 trillion funding bill MORE's (R-Ky.) filibuster of John Brennan for CIA director. Rubio has also participated in bipartisan effort to pass a big immigration reform bill.