A bipartisan Senate immigration plan could double the number of visas granted for high-skilled foreign workers, a victory for the tech industry, which has pushed for the reforms.

The number of H-1B visas would double from a current limit of 65,000 per year, according to a report Thursday in The Washington Post. The immigration plan would also grant permanent legal residency to foreign students who graduate from American universities with science, engineering or technology degrees.

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Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinMcCarthy: ‘No deadline on DACA’ Ex-Sheriff David Clarke: Trump only one who 'cares about black American citizens' DHS chief takes heat over Trump furor MORE (D-Ill.), part of the Senate immigration group, is pushing for restrictions on the plan, including measures to prevent some firms that are heavily dependent on H-1B visas from hiring more workers and requirements for companies to make efforts to hire American workers first.  

The talks on high-skilled-worker visas are just one element of a comprehensive immigration reform plan being finalized by the Senate’s bipartisan Gang of Eight.

The group unveiled a framework calling for heightened border security, a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants already in the country and the creation of a guest worker program and increased high-skilled immigration in January. But negotiations over the details of that plan have delayed senators from offering a bill, though sources say they expect draft language by the end of March.

On the House side, another bipartisan group is also nearing a deal, with leaders from both parties endorsing the efforts. 

Major tech companies have made a strong push for Washington to revamp immigration rules for high-skilled workers.

Last week, in a letter to President Obama and lawmakers, a number of high-profile CEOs, including Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and Yahoo’s Marissa Mayer, said that being able to hire more high-skilled workers and retain foreign students enrolled in U.S. schools is key to keeping American companies globally competitive. Tech companies fear that American schools are failing to produce enough graduates with advanced science and engineering degrees.

Two Senate bills would expand the H-1B visa program. In January, Sens. Chris CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsA Department of Energy foundation: An idea whose time has come We must reconcile privacy and safety in the digital era Protecting intellectual property in America is harder than ever MORE (D-Del.), Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchKoch groups: Don't renew expired tax breaks in government funding bill Hatch tweets link to 'invisible' glasses after getting spotted removing pair that wasn't there DHS giving ‘active defense’ cyber tools to private sector, secretary says MORE (R-Utah), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharOvernight Cybersecurity: Bipartisan bill aims to deter election interference | Russian hackers target Senate | House Intel panel subpoenas Bannon | DHS giving 'active defense' cyber tools to private sector Pawlenty opts out of Senate run in Minnesota Nielsen says 'possible' Trump used vulgar language in meeting MORE (D-Minn.) and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Cybersecurity: Bipartisan bill aims to deter election interference | Russian hackers target Senate | House Intel panel subpoenas Bannon | DHS giving 'active defense' cyber tools to private sector Senators unveil bipartisan push to deter future election interference Puerto Rico's children need recovery funds MORE (R-Fla.) introduced the Immigration Innovation Act, which would increase the number of visas to 115,000. 

The measure would also allow greater flexibility, by allowing for additional visas to be granted up to a limit of 300,000 if the initial cap is surpassed.

The Startup Act, introduced by Sen. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranDoug Jones to become only Dem senator with black chief of staff Congress should stand for rural America by enhancing broadband connectivity Immigrant entrepreneurs are vital to American prosperity MORE (R-Kan.), addressed the issue by creating a new visa that would allow foreign science and tech graduates of U.S. universities to apply for a green card.

Proponents of increased high-skilled immigration, however, believe the best change for reforming the H-1B laws is through a comprehensive package.