Sen. Mark BegichMark Peter BegichPerez creates advisory team for DNC transition The future of the Arctic 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map MORE (D-Alaska) late Monday night added his voice to the growing chorus of Democratic senators announcing support for gay marriage ahead of Tuesday's hearing at the Supreme Court.

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"I believe that same-sex couples should be able to marry and should have the same rights, privileges and responsibilities as any other married couple," the Alaskan senator said in a statement obtained by Buzzfeed.

"Government should keep out of individuals' personal lives—if someone wants to marry someone they love, they should be able to. Alaskans are fed up with government intrusion into our private lives, our daily business, and in the way we manage our resources and economy," he continued.

The statement precedes oral arguments at the Supreme Court on Tuesday and Wednesday on a pair of cases examining states' and the federal government's ability to define marriage as a union between a man and a woman.

On Monday, Sens. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerSenate panel moves forward with bill to roll back Dodd-Frank Comey back in the spotlight after Flynn makes a deal Warner: Every week another shoe drops in Russia investigation MORE (D-Va.) and Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillDemocrats turn on Al Franken Trump rips Dems a day ahead of key White House meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (D-Mo.) also announced their support for gay marriage; last week, Republican Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanMcConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees Overnight Finance: House approves motion to go to tax conference — with drama | GOP leaders to consider Dec. 30 spending bill | Justices skeptical of ban on sports betting | Mulvaney won't fire official who sued him How four GOP senators guided a tax-bill victory behind the scenes MORE (Ohio) and former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGrassley blasts Democrats over unwillingness to probe Clinton GOP lawmakers cite new allegations of political bias in FBI Top intel Dem: Trump Jr. refused to answer questions about Trump Tower discussions with father MORE similarly announced shifts on the subject.

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The flood of lawmakers now backing same-sex marriage is partially an indication of shifting national attitudes. A Washington Post / ABC News poll released last week showed that 58 percent of Americans backed gay marriage, an all-time high.