White House press secretary Jay Carney on Tuesday criticized three Senate Republicans who have threatened to filibuster Senate gun control legislation.

Carney said a filibuster would be “unfortunate” and would send the wrong message to the families of gun violence victims.

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“I don't think you need to tell the families of those who have lost their children to gun violence that bills like this may be filibustered. I don't think that would be welcome news,” Carney said.

GOP Sens. Rand PaulRand PaulGOP rep: Trump has 'extra-constitutional' view of presidency The ignored question: What does the future Republican Party look like? Rand Paul skeptical about Romney as secretary of State MORE (Ky.), Mike LeeMike LeeOvernight Healthcare: Medical cures bill finally heads to White House Overnight Energy: Trump taps EPA foe to head agency | Energy reform bill officially dead Senate GOP: National museum should include Clarence Thomas MORE (Utah), and Ted CruzTed CruzCruz defends Trump's Taiwan call Ark., Texas senators put cheese dip vs. queso to the test Pentagon's suppressed waste report only tip of the inefficient machine MORE (Texas) threatened to filibuster the bill in a letter to Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidSenate holds two-hour Biden lovefest Dem senator threatens to slow-walk spending bill The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (D-Nev.) that argued it was an infringement of Second Amendment rights. The bill would expand background checks and penalties on straw purchases of firearms.

The senators pledged to “oppose the motion to proceed to any legislation that will serve as a vehicle for any additional gun restrictions.”

“The Second Amendment to the Constitution protects citizens' right to self-defense. It speaks to history's lesson that government cannot be in all places at all times, and history's warning about the oppression of a government that tries,” they wrote.

Carney dismissed any suggestion that the proposed legislation would violate Second Amendment rights.

“As an absolute matter of fact, in my view, and, I think, many others', including constitutional experts, there's not a single measure in this package of proposals the president has put forward that, in any way, violates the Constitution,” Carney said. “And in fact they reflect the president's commitment to our Second Amendment rights.”

Carney added that the measures in the Senate gun bill, which doesn't include controversial provisions that would limit the sale of some military-style weapons and high-capacity magazines, enjoyed broad support among voters.

“Closing gun show loopholes, that's an idea that has something like 90 percent support in the United States,” he said, referring to private sales that don't currently require background checks.

Carney sidestepped when asked if the White House believed it had the 60 votes necessary to break a filibuster, saying President Obama “certainly hopes” the upper chamber will pass the bill.

He also said Obama has been lobbying members of Congress behind the scenes.

“He — and that — will continue, as will our staff interaction with Congress on these issues. And you'll continue to hear the president, in public, discuss the need to move forward on these important measures,” Carney said.