Ryan warns donors GOP could lose House: report
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Speaker Paul RyanPaul RyanRyan: Graham-Cassidy 'best, last chance' to repeal ObamaCare Ryan: Americans want to see Trump talking with Dem leaders Overnight Finance: CBO to release limited analysis of ObamaCare repeal bill | DOJ investigates Equifax stock sales | House weighs tougher rules for banks dealing with North Korea MORE (R-Wis.) is warning donors that the Republican Party's House majority could be in jeopardy, according to The New York Times.

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Ryan spoke in private last week to a group of donors at a political conference in Colorado sponsored by industrialists Charles and David Koch.

During the conference, the Speaker said donors shouldn't put their focus completely on the Senate and noted that Republican control of the House may also be at risk, the Times reported, citing a Republican who heard the talk.

There is reportedly growing concern among the party's wealthiest contributors over retaining control of Congress with Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden slams Trump over golf gif hitting Clinton Trump Jr. declines further Secret Service protection: report Report: Mueller warned Manafort to expect an indictment MORE as the party's presidential nominee.

Democrats would need to pick up more than 30 House seats to take control. But according to the Times, Republicans are worried about a scenario in which they lose enough seats that Ryan is weakened and the party is on the defensive.

The Times report on Saturday painted a broad picture of Republicans worried about the impact of Trump on down-ballot races.

The party's nominee has had a difficult two weeks, capped off by the overwhelming criticism over his fight with the family of Army Capt. Humayun Khan, a soldier killed in 2004 in Iraq.

Trump also last week declined to endorse Ryan and Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainSenate's defense authorization would set cyber doctrine Senate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill Overnight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions MORE (R-Ariz.) for reelection. But the GOP changed course on Friday and backed both men.

Ryan said last week his endorsement of Trump shouldn't be seen as a blank check, noting the candidate's campaign has had a "pretty strange run since the convention."

Polls have also shown Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden slams Trump over golf gif hitting Clinton Overnight Cybersecurity: Equifax hit by earlier hack | What to know about Kaspersky controversy | Officials review EU-US privacy pact Overnight Tech: Equifax hit by earlier undisclosed hack | Facebook takes heat over Russian ads | Alt-right Twitter rival may lose domain MORE with a strong bounce after the Democratic National Convention. Clinton is leading in a number of surveys nationally and in many battleground states, adding to Republicans worries.

Donors had hoped Trump would begin to shift his focus ahead of the general election.

“The conclusion has become that the guy is incorrigible,” said Thomas M. Davis III, a former House member from Virginia who is still close to many of the party’s leaders, according to The New York Times.

“He’s going to leave our candidates with no choice but to go their own separate way.”