Sen. Richard BlumenthalRichard BlumenthalOvernight Tech: AT&T, Time Warner CEOs defend merger before Congress | More tech execs join Trump team | Republican details path to undoing net neutrality Overnight Energy: Trump taps EPA foe to head agency | Energy reform bill officially dead CNN’s parent company promises to defend journalistic independence MORE (D-Conn.) on Sunday pledged to introduce an amendment to ban the sale of high-capacity gun magazines, when the Senate considers a gun bill next month.

“The majority leader has assured me and other proponents of these measures that we can offer amendments on both the assault weapons ban and the prohibition on high-capacity magazines. So, there will be votes and I intend to spearhead that amendment on the high-capacity magazines,” said Blumenthal on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

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Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidReid: Filibuster will end, it's just a matter of when Senate holds two-hour Biden lovefest Dem senator threatens to slow-walk spending bill MORE (D-Nev.) is bringing a gun control bill including provisions to expand background checks and tighten penalties on straw purchasers to the floor. But the measure excludes proposals to ban the sale of assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition.

With any gun bill facing a tough challenge in the face of GOP and gun lobby opposition, Reid said he feared those two controversial measures would drag down the entire bill.

But the Democratic leader has said he would allow votes on those proposals as amendments and Blumenthal said Sunday he would act on that promise.

The bill’s prospects though are uncertain with give GOP senators vowing to filibuster any further “gun restrictions.” The gun bill also includes Democratic language on a background check after Sen. Charles SchumerCharles SchumerDems see ’18 upside in ObamaCare repeal Confirm Gary Richard Brown for the Eastern District of New York Voters want to drain the swamp? They can start with Louisiana GOP MORE was unable to craft a deal on the issue with Republicans.

Blumenthal, though, said he was optimistic an accord could be reached.

“I think there is a sensible compromise that we can reach on background checks that will extend them,” he said.