Sen. Richard BlumenthalRichard BlumenthalDemocrats exploring lawsuit against Trump Overnight Finance: Dems explore lawsuit against Trump | Full-court press for Trump tax plan | Clock ticks down to spending deadline FCC head unveils plan to roll back net neutrality MORE (D-Conn.) on Sunday pledged to introduce an amendment to ban the sale of high-capacity gun magazines, when the Senate considers a gun bill next month.

“The majority leader has assured me and other proponents of these measures that we can offer amendments on both the assault weapons ban and the prohibition on high-capacity magazines. So, there will be votes and I intend to spearhead that amendment on the high-capacity magazines,” said Blumenthal on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

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Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidDraft House bill ignites new Yucca Mountain fight Week ahead: House to revive Yucca Mountain fight Warren builds her brand with 2020 down the road MORE (D-Nev.) is bringing a gun control bill including provisions to expand background checks and tighten penalties on straw purchasers to the floor. But the measure excludes proposals to ban the sale of assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition.

With any gun bill facing a tough challenge in the face of GOP and gun lobby opposition, Reid said he feared those two controversial measures would drag down the entire bill.

But the Democratic leader has said he would allow votes on those proposals as amendments and Blumenthal said Sunday he would act on that promise.

The bill’s prospects though are uncertain with give GOP senators vowing to filibuster any further “gun restrictions.” The gun bill also includes Democratic language on a background check after Sen. Charles SchumerCharles SchumerReagan's 'voodoo economics' are precisely what America needs When political opportunity knocked, Jason Chaffetz never failed to cash in Yes, blame Obama for the sorry state of the Democratic Party MORE was unable to craft a deal on the issue with Republicans.

Blumenthal, though, said he was optimistic an accord could be reached.

“I think there is a sensible compromise that we can reach on background checks that will extend them,” he said.