Clinton confidante: Sanders did 'significant damage'
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Longtime Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonTrump Jr. adds to legal team ahead of Senate meeting Trump: Democrats, Russians laughing at 'phony Russian Witch Hunt' Scaramucci makes Sunday shows debut with vow to stop WH leaks MORE confidante Neera Tanden in a new podcast commends Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders keeping door open on 2020 Parliamentarian deals setback to GOP repeal bill OPINION | Hey Dems, Russia won't define 2018, so why not fix your party's problems instead? MORE for the issues he raised during his campaign but notes his attacks on the Democratic presidential nominee were harmful.

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“I actually have to say, I think he brought a lot of really important issues to the floor, but Senator Sanders was prosecuting a much tougher character attack” than Barack ObamaBarack ObamaConway: Trump doesn't think he's lying on voter fraud, wiretap claims Trump's forgotten man and woman — still forgotten Jeb Bush calls out Republicans silent on Trump's Russia probe MORE did in 2008, Tanden said during Politico’s “Off Message” podcast.

“He did do significant damage to Hillary's negatives."

During the primary season, the Vermont senator often attacked the eventual Democratic nominee on the campaign trail — at points, questioning her judgment.

“I mean, he drove a lot of those negatives, and the truth of it, I mean, just to be candid — or honest about it, I think getting those kinds of attacks from another Democrat or another liberal or another progressive is much tougher for Hillary," said Tanden, who is the president of the liberal think tank Center for American Progress.

"If you look at her trust numbers the last six months of that primary ... those numbers took a much sharper dive and [were] hard to recover from.”

Sanders endorsed Clinton ahead of the Democratic National Convention, vowing to help the Democratic nominee win the presidency.

But Tanden, who supported Clinton's shift to the left due in part to Sanders's criticism, said the Vermont senator may have let the primary stretch out too long.

"The primary was much tougher [than 2008]," she said.

"There were many more open attacks on being 'bought and paid for' and all that stuff."