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“It’s very rare you go back a generation," Stevens said.

In a Quinnipiac University poll released earlier this month, Clinton dominated the Democratic field, garnering the support of 65 percent of potential primary voters. The next closest candidate, Vice President Biden, earned 13 percent, with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo rounding out the top three at 4 percent.

In a highly circulated op-ed piece written in February, Stevens argued Republicans would benefit in the coming election because of the age of their top presidential candidates.

"For 2016, the Democrats seem headed toward a fight between Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGrassley blasts Democrats over unwillingness to probe Clinton GOP lawmakers cite new allegations of political bias in FBI Top intel Dem: Trump Jr. refused to answer questions about Trump Tower discussions with father MORE and Joe BidenJoseph (Joe) Robinette BidenOvernight Tech: FCC won't delay net neutrality vote | Google pulls YouTube from Amazon devices | Biden scolds social media firms over transparency Medicaid funds shouldn't be used to subsidize state taxes on health care Biden hits social media firms over lack of transparency MORE. Both launched their careers in the 1970s; what will their slogan be, “Another Century of Service”?" Stevens wrote. 

"On our side, we have Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanMcConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees House Republican: 'I worry about both sides' of the aisle on DACA Overnight Health Care: 3.6M signed up for ObamaCare in first month | Ryan pledges 'entitlement reform' next year | Dems push for more money to fight opioids MORE, Nikki Haley, Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRyan pledges 'entitlement reform' in 2018 Richard Gere welcomes lawmakers' words of support for Tibet Dem lawmaker gives McConnell's tax reform op-ed a failing grade MORE, Chris Christie, Jeb Bush, Susana Martinez and more. Who has the best opportunity to win that generational battle?"