Cook: Clinton passes 1M in popular vote lead
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Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden slams Trump over golf gif hitting Clinton Overnight Cybersecurity: Equifax hit by earlier hack | What to know about Kaspersky controversy | Officials review EU-US privacy pact Overnight Tech: Equifax hit by earlier undisclosed hack | Facebook takes heat over Russian ads | Alt-right Twitter rival may lose domain MORE has surpassed 1 million in her popular vote margin over President-elect Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden slams Trump over golf gif hitting Clinton Trump Jr. declines further Secret Service protection: report Report: Mueller warned Manafort to expect an indictment MORE, according to a Tuesday tally from the nonpartisan Cook Political Report. 

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Clinton leads Trump in the popular vote, 61,694,263 to 60,961,967, Cook officials said, with 20,000 votes from Montgomery County, Md., pushing her over the 1 million mark. 

Trump won the White House via the Electoral College a week ago, while the former secretary of State is now the fifth nominee in American history to win the popular vote but lose the presidency. 

The most recent example came in 2000, when Al GoreAl GoreStop the loose talk about hurricanes and global warming Parties struggle with shifting coalitions OPINION | Midterms may provide Dems control — and chance to impeach MORE won the popular vote but lost the Electoral College to President George W. Bush via a razor-thin margin in Florida. 

Online petitions with millions of signatures have called on electors to vote for Clinton when they vote in December, citing her lead in the popular vote. 

Those are highly unlikely to go anywhere, as electors would be unwilling to ignore precedent or vote against their state's pick.

Still, Democrats, including 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersOvernight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions Senate passes 0B defense bill Dems fear lasting damage from Clinton-Sanders fight MORE, have called for a reexamination of the Electoral College. 

Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara BoxerTrump riles Dems with pick for powerful EPA job Pelosi's chief of staff stepping down Time is now to address infrastructure needs MORE (D-Calif.) introduced legislation on Tuesday to get rid of the institution. 

"In my lifetime, I have seen two elections where the winner of the general election did not win the popular vote," Boxer said in a statement.

"The Electoral College is an outdated, undemocratic system that does not reflect our modern society, and it needs to change immediately."

Boxer's legislation is unlikely to pass, however. 

Even if it is approved by Congress, it would need to be approved by three-fourths of the states within seven years before it would take effect. 

The president-elect has flipped on his feelings regarding the Electoral College, calling it "genius" on Tuesday after labeling it a "disaster for democracy" in 2012. Trump said if the election were based on popular vote, he would have campaigned differently and beaten Clinton that way, too.