Cook: Clinton passes 1M in popular vote lead
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Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump adds to legal team after attacks on Mueller Press: You can’t believe a word he says Feehery: March Madness MORE has surpassed 1 million in her popular vote margin over President-elect Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpLieu: There will be 'widespread civil unrest' if Trump fires Mueller Attorneys for Trump, Mueller hold face-to-face meeting to discuss potential interview topics: report Trump tariffs not helpful for nuclear talks, South Korea says MORE, according to a Tuesday tally from the nonpartisan Cook Political Report. 

Clinton leads Trump in the popular vote, 61,694,263 to 60,961,967, Cook officials said, with 20,000 votes from Montgomery County, Md., pushing her over the 1 million mark. 

Trump won the White House via the Electoral College a week ago, while the former secretary of State is now the fifth nominee in American history to win the popular vote but lose the presidency. 

The most recent example came in 2000, when Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreKim Jong Un’s killer Trump trap Cuomo: 'Offshore drilling is a really, really dumb idea' Left-wing, right-wing: The case for realignment of political labels MORE won the popular vote but lost the Electoral College to President George W. Bush via a razor-thin margin in Florida. 

Online petitions with millions of signatures have called on electors to vote for Clinton when they vote in December, citing her lead in the popular vote. 

Those are highly unlikely to go anywhere, as electors would be unwilling to ignore precedent or vote against their state's pick.

Still, Democrats, including 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersSenate tees up Yemen vote for Tuesday Sanders supporters cancel Clinton protest Congress moving to end US involvement in Yemen MORE, have called for a reexamination of the Electoral College. 

Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerThe ‘bang for the buck’ theory fueling Trump’s infrastructure plan Kamala Harris endorses Gavin Newsom for California governor Dems face hard choice for State of the Union response MORE (D-Calif.) introduced legislation on Tuesday to get rid of the institution. 

"In my lifetime, I have seen two elections where the winner of the general election did not win the popular vote," Boxer said in a statement.

"The Electoral College is an outdated, undemocratic system that does not reflect our modern society, and it needs to change immediately."

Boxer's legislation is unlikely to pass, however. 

Even if it is approved by Congress, it would need to be approved by three-fourths of the states within seven years before it would take effect. 

The president-elect has flipped on his feelings regarding the Electoral College, calling it "genius" on Tuesday after labeling it a "disaster for democracy" in 2012. Trump said if the election were based on popular vote, he would have campaigned differently and beaten Clinton that way, too.