Cook: Clinton passes 1M in popular vote lead
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Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGrassley blasts Democrats over unwillingness to probe Clinton GOP lawmakers cite new allegations of political bias in FBI Top intel Dem: Trump Jr. refused to answer questions about Trump Tower discussions with father MORE has surpassed 1 million in her popular vote margin over President-elect Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpHouse Democrat slams Donald Trump Jr. for ‘serious case of amnesia’ after testimony Skier Lindsey Vonn: I don’t want to represent Trump at Olympics Poll: 4 in 10 Republicans think senior Trump advisers had improper dealings with Russia MORE, according to a Tuesday tally from the nonpartisan Cook Political Report. 

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Clinton leads Trump in the popular vote, 61,694,263 to 60,961,967, Cook officials said, with 20,000 votes from Montgomery County, Md., pushing her over the 1 million mark. 

Trump won the White House via the Electoral College a week ago, while the former secretary of State is now the fifth nominee in American history to win the popular vote but lose the presidency. 

The most recent example came in 2000, when Al GoreAl GoreTrump’s isolationism on full display at international climate talks Overnight Energy: Trump officials defend fossil fuels, nuclear at UN climate summit | Dems commit to Paris goals | Ex-EPA lawyers slam 'sue and settle' policy Al Gore: A new president in 2020 could keep US in Paris agreement MORE won the popular vote but lost the Electoral College to President George W. Bush via a razor-thin margin in Florida. 

Online petitions with millions of signatures have called on electors to vote for Clinton when they vote in December, citing her lead in the popular vote. 

Those are highly unlikely to go anywhere, as electors would be unwilling to ignore precedent or vote against their state's pick.

Still, Democrats, including 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersSchumer: Franken should resign Franken resignation could upend Minnesota races Avalanche of Democratic senators say Franken should resign MORE, have called for a reexamination of the Electoral College. 

Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerBarbara Boxer recounts harassment on Capitol Hill: ‘The entire audience started laughing’ 100 years of the Blue Slip courtesy Four more lawmakers say they’ve been sexually harassed by colleagues in Congress MORE (D-Calif.) introduced legislation on Tuesday to get rid of the institution. 

"In my lifetime, I have seen two elections where the winner of the general election did not win the popular vote," Boxer said in a statement.

"The Electoral College is an outdated, undemocratic system that does not reflect our modern society, and it needs to change immediately."

Boxer's legislation is unlikely to pass, however. 

Even if it is approved by Congress, it would need to be approved by three-fourths of the states within seven years before it would take effect. 

The president-elect has flipped on his feelings regarding the Electoral College, calling it "genius" on Tuesday after labeling it a "disaster for democracy" in 2012. Trump said if the election were based on popular vote, he would have campaigned differently and beaten Clinton that way, too.