Trump turning down intelligence briefings since victory: report
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Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says he doesn't want to use 'adversary' to describe Russia Comey urges Americans to vote for Democrats in midterms Roby wins Alabama GOP runoff, overcoming blowback from Trump criticism MORE has been turning away intelligence briefings since winning the presidency earlier this month, The Washington Post reported.

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Since his win, the president-elect has received only two classified intelligence briefings — an initial briefing he got within days of his victory and a second he received on Tuesday in New York before leaving for Florida for the Thanksgiving holiday.

That number so far is lower than his predecessors, according to current and former U.S. officials.

In the two weeks since the election, intelligence analysts have been ready to give Trump daily briefings on global developments and security threats, according to The Post.

Vice President-elect Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceLewandowski: Trump-Putin meeting advances goal of world peace Indiana has spent over million on cleanup of failed Pence family gas stations: report What really happened with the breastfeeding scandal in Geneva MORE has reportedly made time almost every day since the election to receive the intelligence briefings.

A senior U.S. official who gets the same briefings President Obama receives every day said the president-elect has "a lot of catching up to do," and suggested the briefings could help.

Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee and a member of Trump's transition team, dismissed criticism and called national security the president-elect's "No. 1 priority."

"And I think he’s taking it very seriously,” Nunes said in an interview with The Post.  

“Look how many leaders he’s met with, how many phone calls he’s done, positions he’s filled. People who are being critical need to get a life.”
 
Michael Morell, former deputy CIA director, said the last three presidents-elect made use of the intelligence briefings offered "to literally study the national security issues that they would be facing and the world leaders with whom they would be interacting with as president."

“The president-elect is missing out on a golden opportunity to learn about the national security threats and challenges facing our nation,” said Morell, who supported Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonOvernight Defense: Trump tries to quell Russia furor | GOP looks to reassure NATO | Mattis open to meeting Russian counterpart Dem pollster: GOP women have a more difficult time winning primary races than Dems Mellman: (Mis)interpreting elections MORE.

“Knowledge that would be extremely valuable to have when he takes the oath of office and when he steps into the Situation Room for the first time."