Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMellman: Memories may be beautiful, yet… Schumer to oppose Pompeo as secretary of State Arizona GOP blocked from changing rules on filling McCain's seat MORE (R-Ariz.) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP anxiety grows over Trump’s Iran decision Overnight Cybersecurity: Senators eye path forward on election security bill | Facebook isn't winning over privacy advocates | New hacks target health care Paul backs Pompeo, clearing path for confirmation MORE (R-S.C.) met with President Obama at the White House on Wednesday to discuss national security issues.

It is the second meeting in as many weeks for McCain with the president. Last week, he and Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerCan Mueller be more honest than his colleagues? Throwing some cold water on all of the Korean summit optimism House Republicans push Mulvaney, Trump to rescind Gateway funds MORE (D-N.Y.) huddled with the president in the Oval Office to discuss a way forward on immigration reform.

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The meeting also came just a day after Graham told The Hill that the U.S. should consider boycotting the 2014 Winter Olympics in Russia if authorities there decided to offer asylum to Edward Snowden, the former Defense contractor who has claimed responsibility for leaking classified information about top-secret National Security Agency surveillance programs.

White House press secretary Jay Carney would not categorically rule out a boycott on Wednesday, despite admitting he thought it was a bad idea. But Graham stood by his suggestion when talking to reporters yesterday afternoon.

McCain has also played a role in a set of meetings with White House chief of staff Denis McDonoughDenis Richard McDonoughEx-Obama chief of staff: Obama's Russia response was 'watered down' Former Obama officials launch advocacy group aimed at Trump's foreign policy Obama: Bannon, Breitbart shifted media narrative in 'powerful direction' MORE and other Republican lawmakers attempting to plot a budget grand bargain, according to reports.

The meeting was not on the president's official schedule.

McCain and Graham have been harsh critics of many of Obama's foreign policy decisions, urging him to do more to aid rebel groups in Syria seeking the ouster of President Bashar Assad and questioning the administration's rapid drawdown of combat forces from Afghanistan.