Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellUN contacted Trump administration on ObamaCare repeal: report Congress nears deal on help for miners Shutdown fears spur horse-trading MORE said Wednesday that Republicans will not accept any Democratic efforts to block a Supreme Court nominee chosen by President-elect Trump.

“Apparently there’s yet a new standard now to not confirm a Supreme Court nominee at all,” McConnell said. "I think that’s something the American people simply will not tolerate and we’ll be looking forward to receiving a Supreme Court nomination and moving forward on it.”

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McConnell's remarks come after nearly 10 months of Senate Republican opposition to the Supreme Court nomination of Merrick Garland, the federal appeals court judge nominated by President Obama in March 2016. Senate Republicans have refused to hold a hearing or vote on Garland's nomination, arguing that the opening should be filled by the next president. 

Speaking on Capitol Hill Wednesday alongside Vice President-elect Mike PenceMike (Michael) Richard PenceTrump to meet with Australian prime minister next month Ex-acting AG Sally Yates to testify at Senate Russia hearing in May US calls on N. Korea to stop 'destabilizing actions and rhetoric' MORE, McConnell responded to Senate Minority Leader Chuck SchumerCharles SchumerUN contacted Trump administration on ObamaCare repeal: report GOP fundraiser enters crowded primary for Pa. Senate seat Dems: Trump risks government shutdown over border wall MORE’s statement that Democrats would not accept on a Supreme Court nominee they wouldn’t approve of.

“We’re not going to settle on a Supreme Court nominee,” Schumer told MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow on Tuesday. “If they don’t appoint someone who’s really good, we’re gonna oppose him tooth and nail.”

In his MSNBC appearance, Schumer said he doubted Trump would ever choose a candidate Democrats would support.

"It's hard for me to imagine a nominee that Donald TrumpDonald TrumpCaitlyn Jenner: 'I would seriously look at a run' for office Priebus: Syria, China moves part of 'Trump Doctrine' Poll: Most millennials disapprove of Trump MORE chooses that would get Republican support that we could support," Schumer said.

In his remarks Wednesday, McConnell accused Schumer of instituting an "expansion of the Biden rule"—a reference to a 1992 speech given by then-Senator Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump’s wall jams GOP in shutdown talks Bipartisan friendship is a civil solution to political dysfunction Warren builds her brand with 2020 down the road MORE arguing that any Supreme Court opening should be filled after that year's presidential election. Republicans have used Biden's 1992 speech to justify their block on Garland's nomination.