Sen. Tom CoburnTom CoburnCoburn: Trump's tweets aren't presidential The road ahead for America’s highways Rethinking taxation MORE (R-Okla.) said Friday that a plan spearheaded by Sen. Mike LeeMike LeeRight renews push for term limits as Trump takes power Conservatives press Trump on Supreme Court pick Overnight Finance: Ethics chief blasts Trump business plan | Senate begins late-night marathon vote | Lawmakers look to rein in Trump on trade MORE (R-Utah) — and endorsed by at least a dozen Republican senators — to shut down the government to block funds for ObamaCare would cost the GOP control of the House and could destroy the party.

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“The strategy that has been laid out is a good way for Republicans to lose the House,” Coburn said in an interview with The Washington Examiner's Byron York.

“Lee’s answer [to critics] is, ‘Give me a different strategy,’” Coburn said. “Well, there isn’t one, because we lost the [election]. I’m getting phone calls from Oklahoma saying, ‘support Mike Lee,’ and I’m ramming right back — support him in destroying the Republican party?”

Lee says he’s recruited more than a dozen Republican colleagues willing to block a continuing resolution to fund the government beyond Sept. 30 if it includes funding for ObamaCare.

The second- and third-ranking members of Republican leadership, Sens. John CornynJohn CornynSenate panel sets vote on Sessions for AG Obama commutes Chelsea Manning's sentence Report: Concealed-carry permit holders have killed hundreds since 2007 MORE (Texas) and John ThuneJohn ThuneWhy Trump should abolish the White House faith office Trump’s infrastructure plan: What we know Senate takes first step toward repealing ObamaCare MORE (S.D.), have said they support Lee’s plan, as do influential conservatives and potential presidential candidates Sens. Marco RubioMarco RubioRubio wades into Trump-Lewis feud 19 companies that Trump has tweeted about Ex-Dem gov: I would have picked Giuliani over Tillerson MORE (Fla.) and Ted CruzTed CruzGraham, Cruz proposal to defund the U.N. is misguided Right renews push for term limits as Trump takes power Dissenting nominees give hope to GOP skeptics of Trump MORE (Texas).

However, Sens. John McCainJohn McCainOvernight Cybersecurity: Obama commutes Chelsea Manning's sentence | A malware mystery Overnight Defense: Obama commutes Manning's sentence | Boeing sees 'progress' on Air Force One costs | McCain's 0B defense budget McCain: Leak of Trump dossier ‘totally wrong’ MORE (R-Ari.) and Roy BluntRoy BluntTrump told of unsubstantiated Russian effort to compromise him Overnight Tech: Tech listens for clues at Sessions hearing | EU weighs expanding privacy rule | Senators blast Backpage execs A bitter end to the VA status quo MORE (R-Mo.) spoke out against the plan earlier this week. Sen. Richard BurrRichard BurrSenators introduce dueling miners bills Trump education pick to face Warren, Sanders Senate Intel panel to probe Trump team's ties to Russia MORE (R-N.C.) called it “the dumbest idea I've ever heard.”

Coburn on Friday told The Washington Examiner he opposes Obamacare. But the GOP scheme did nothing more than create false expectations for the Republican base, because there’s no chance Obama will sign into law a spending bill that defunds his signature healthcare legislation, he said.

“The worst thing is being dishonest with your base about what you can accomplish, ginning everybody up and then creating disappointment,” he said. “It’s a terribly dangerous and not successful strategy.”

“You’re going to set an expectation among the conservatives in our party that we can achieve something that we’re not able to achieve,” he added. “It’s not an achievable strategy. It’s creating the false impression that you can do something when you can’t. And it’s dishonest.”