Sen. Tom CoburnTom CoburnThe more complex the tax code, the more the wealthy benefit Congress, stop using our nation's military policy for political purposes Congress must rid itself of political 'pork' to preserve its integrity MORE (R-Okla.) said Friday that a plan spearheaded by Sen. Mike LeeMike LeeOvernight Cybersecurity: Senate sends Russia sanctions bill to Trump | Senators unveil email privacy bill | Russia tried to spy on Macron with Facebook Overnight Tech: Driverless car bill advances in House | Bezos now world's richest person | Tech groups hail new email privacy bill How do you get lower cost drugs? Give the FDA a bigger stick MORE (R-Utah) — and endorsed by at least a dozen Republican senators — to shut down the government to block funds for ObamaCare would cost the GOP control of the House and could destroy the party.

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“The strategy that has been laid out is a good way for Republicans to lose the House,” Coburn said in an interview with The Washington Examiner's Byron York.

“Lee’s answer [to critics] is, ‘Give me a different strategy,’” Coburn said. “Well, there isn’t one, because we lost the [election]. I’m getting phone calls from Oklahoma saying, ‘support Mike Lee,’ and I’m ramming right back — support him in destroying the Republican party?”

Lee says he’s recruited more than a dozen Republican colleagues willing to block a continuing resolution to fund the government beyond Sept. 30 if it includes funding for ObamaCare.

The second- and third-ranking members of Republican leadership, Sens. John CornynJohn CornynSenate heading for late night ahead of ObamaCare repeal showdown Two GOP senators back ObamaCare repeal after Ryan call Senate releases 'skinny' ObamaCare repeal bill MORE (Texas) and John ThuneJohn ThuneBoth sides of the aisle agree — telemedicine is the future Congress should address the critical pilot shortage Senate rejects repeal-only ObamaCare plan MORE (S.D.), have said they support Lee’s plan, as do influential conservatives and potential presidential candidates Sens. Marco RubioMarco RubioMexican politicians have a new piñata: Donald Trump Bush ethics lawyer: Congress must tell Trump not to fire Mueller The private alternative to the National Flood Insurance Program  MORE (Fla.) and Ted CruzTed CruzSenate heading for late night ahead of ObamaCare repeal showdown Two GOP senators back ObamaCare repeal after Ryan call Senate releases 'skinny' ObamaCare repeal bill MORE (Texas).

However, Sens. John McCainJohn McCainSenate defeats ObamaCare repeal measure McCain kills GOP's 'skinny' backup ObamaCare repeal plan Senate heading for late night ahead of ObamaCare repeal showdown MORE (R-Ari.) and Roy BluntRoy BluntGOP senators: House agreeing to go to conference on ObamaCare repeal Key senator backs 'skinny' ObamaCare repeal GOP senator: Trump transgender ban ‘deserves more than a Twitter conversation’ MORE (R-Mo.) spoke out against the plan earlier this week. Sen. Richard BurrRichard BurrKushner says he did not collude with Russia, had no improper contacts Dems slam Trump for 'stonewalling' oversight efforts Burr: Nunes 'created' unmasking allegations against Rice MORE (R-N.C.) called it “the dumbest idea I've ever heard.”

Coburn on Friday told The Washington Examiner he opposes Obamacare. But the GOP scheme did nothing more than create false expectations for the Republican base, because there’s no chance Obama will sign into law a spending bill that defunds his signature healthcare legislation, he said.

“The worst thing is being dishonest with your base about what you can accomplish, ginning everybody up and then creating disappointment,” he said. “It’s a terribly dangerous and not successful strategy.”

“You’re going to set an expectation among the conservatives in our party that we can achieve something that we’re not able to achieve,” he added. “It’s not an achievable strategy. It’s creating the false impression that you can do something when you can’t. And it’s dishonest.”