Speaker Paul RyanPaul RyanThe Hill Interview: Budget Chair Black sticks around for now Gun proposal picks up GOP support GOP lawmaker Tim Murphy to retire at end of term MORE (R-Wis.) on Thursday sought to reassure a CNN town hall audience member who asked the lawmaker if she should be deported if Congress repeals President Obama's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

"I want you to know that DACA has helped me. Do you think that I should be deported?" the woman asked, standing alongside her daughter.
 
"No," Ryan replied. "First of all, I can see that you love your daughter and you are a nice person who has a great future ahead of you, and I hope that your future is here."
 
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"I will even repeat the sentiment that our incoming president says — that's the the problem he want's to focus on," Ryan said, gesturing toward another audience member who had asked a question about deporting illegal immigrants who commit violent crimes. "This is not the focus."
 
DACA, an Obama executive order, allows eligible illegal immigrants who came into the country as minors with a work permit and a renewable two-year deferred action from deportation.
 
"And so what we have to do is find a way to make sure that you can get right with the law. And we've got to do this in a good way so that the rug doesn't get pulled out from under you and your family and your family get's separated."
 
The lawmaker said that he wants to find a "humane" solution for families that will be affected by DACA, but also criticized President Obama for implementing the law without legislative approval. 
 
"And we've got to do this in a good way so that the rug doesn't get pulled out from under you and your family and your family get's separated ... I think we have to come up with a solution for DACA kids. And that's something we in Congress and the Trump transition team is working on," he said.
 
"There is a constitutional issue here. Which is, President Obama trying to unilaterally write laws without going through Congress and as you know under Separation of Powers, presidents don't write laws. Congress writes laws," Ryan added.