President Obama will meet with a bipartisan group of lawmakers Thursday afternoon to discuss concerns over top-secret surveillance programs run by the National Security Agency.

"The President believes it is important to hear from the Congress directly, including from some of the programs’ most prominent critics," a White House official said Thursday.

The group of lawmakers includes Sens. Ron WydenRon WydenTrump's Democratic tax dilemma Senate Dems push Trump admin to protect nursing home residents' right to sue Overnight Finance: Trump-Russia probe reportedly expands to possible financial crimes | Cruel September looms for GOP | Senate clears financial nominees | Mulvaney reverses on debt ceiling MORE (D-Ore.) and Mark UdallMark UdallDemocratic primary could upend bid for Colorado seat Picking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups Gorsuch's critics, running out of arguments, falsely scream 'sexist' MORE (D-Colo.), who have questioned the scope of recently revealed NSA surveillance programs and their effects on Americans’ privacy. The White House said that the president extended the invitation to the lawmakers. 

Other attendees include Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne FeinsteinDianne FeinsteinTrump's Democratic tax dilemma Feinstein: Trump immigration policies 'cruel and arbitrary' The Memo: Could Trump’s hard line work on North Korea? MORE (D-Calif.) and ranking member Saxby ChamblissSaxby ChamblissFormer GOP senator: Let Dems engage on healthcare bill OPINION: Left-wing politics will be the demise of the Democratic Party GOP hopefuls crowd Georgia special race MORE (R-Ga.), as well as Sen. Richard DurbinDick DurbinOPINION | DACA helps people achieve the American dream, don't take it away Immigration battlefield widens for Trump, GOP 'Dreamers' deadline looms for Trump MORE (D-Ill.). From the House, Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers (R-Mich.), ranking member Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Md.) and Rep. James Sensenbrenner Jr. (R-Wis.), the original author of the Patriot Act will attend.

The gathering comes just hours after Russian authorities granted temporary asylum to Edward Snowden, the former Defense contractor who leaked details about the programs to a handful of newspapers. Snowden is seeking to avoid extradition to the U.S. where he faces espionage charges.

The administration is making a push to assuage lawmaker concerns about the NSA. The agency's Director Gen. Keith Alexander will provide a classified briefing to House lawmakers on Thursday.

The Obama administration also declassified new documents Wednesday providing details on how the NSA collects records on phone calls within the United States.

President Obama responded to concerns over the top-secret surveillance programs during a closed-door meeting with Democratic senators Wednesday on Capitol Hill.

Sen. Chris MurphyChris MurphyDem senator: Trump team has no idea how to handle North Korea crisis Trump admin not opposed to new war authorization Dem senator: Trump has sent signal that Russia has free rein MORE (D-Conn.) told The Hill that Obama said "he’s willing to get together with members who are concerned about it and try to talk about a potential way forward."

But that could be a tall order with some of the lawmakers, including Udall and Wyden, who have long warned that the government was overreaching with its surveillance efforts. In an interview with CNN on Wednesday, Wyden accused leaders in the intelligence community of having "kept Congress in the dark."

"The Congress have been given inaccurate statements and, in effect, been actively misled," Wyden said.

Asked about the presidential meeting by The Hill, Wyden said he wouldn't comment publicly until the conversation took place.

"I'll be going to that meeting. I'll have something to say after that," he said.

Further details about the NSA's programs continue to emerge. Earlier Wednesday, The Guardian reported that the agency was running a program named XKeyscore that allows intelligence analysts to search databases containing nearly every type of action made by Internet users, including email, online chats and browser history.

White House press secretary Jay Carney said Wednesday that he did not know whether members of Congress had been informed about the XKeyscore program, but also declared "some of the claims made in that article are false."

"As we've explained and the intelligence community has explained, allegations of widespread, unchecked analyst access to NSA collection data are false," Carney said during the daily White House press briefing. "Access to all of NSA's analytic tools is limited to only personnel who require access for their assigned tasks, and there are multiple technical, manual and supervisory checks within the system to prevent from those who don't have access from achieving that access."

One lawmaker who does not appear to have been invited is Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashThe five kinds of Republicans who could primary Trump Overnight Defense: Military won't lift transgender ban until Trump sends directions | House passes national security spending | Russian sanctions bill heads to Trump Overnight Finance: House passes spending bill with border wall funds | Ryan drops border tax idea | Russia sanctions bill goes to Trump's desk | Dems grill bank regulator picks MORE (R-Mich.), who offered an amendment in the House last week that would have stopped the collection of phone records by the NSA. That measure was narrowly defeated in the House, after both Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerIt's time for McConnell to fight with Trump instead of against him How Republicans can bring order out of the GOP's chaos Republican donor sues GOP for fraud over ObamaCare repeal failure MORE (R-Ohio) and the White House urged lawmakers to vote against it.

-Alex Bolton contributed.

This story was published on July 31 at 5:27 p.m. and has been updated.