The Senate is slated to hold a bipartisan caucus meeting on Thursday, just weeks after nearly all senators attended a closed-door joint conference to end a showdown over executive branch nominees.

All 100 senators are invited to attend. According to the Senate schedule, the body will recess for a “bipartisan caucus meeting” after a cloture vote on the Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development appropriations bill.

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The informal gathering was hosted by Sens. Johnny IsaksonJohn (Johnny) Hardy IsaksonSenate ethics panel wants details on sexual harassment allegations Senate leaders push tax debate into Friday Senate Ethics Committee opens 'preliminary inquiry' into Franken allegations MORE (R-Ga.), Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerSenator predicts Congress will wrap up tax work in two weeks The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on Senate tax bill US warship collides with Japanese tug boat MORE (R-Miss.), Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenDems demand Tillerson end State hiring freeze, consult with Congress The Hill Interview: GOP chairman says ‘red flags’ surround Russian cyber firm Schumer celebrates New York Giants firing head coach: ‘About time’ MORE (D-N.H.) and Mark PryorMark PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (D-Ark.).

An aide said there was no special agenda for Thursday’s meeting, and it would take place in the Russell Senate Office Building rather than the old chamber. Senators will be provided with food from Isakson’s home state. A similar gathering was hosted last year before the August recess.

The move comes less than a month after the full body met in the Old Senate Chamber to hash out a compromise to allow a vote on a host of President Obama’s executive branch nominees in exchange for Democrats abandoning the “nuclear option,” which would have changed Senate rules.

Only two members missed the last meeting in July.

A bipartisan group of senators sent a letter to Senate leaders shortly after last month’s meeting requesting that the leadership make the meetings a regular occurrence.

A Senate aide on background said the meeting was mainly social and intended to keep the lines of communication open.

A number of executive nominations have been allowed to proceed after last month’s agreement, including Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthyGina McCarthyThe media’s tactics to silence science at Trump’s EPA Overnight Energy: EPA releases ozone findings | Lawmakers come out against Perry grid plan | Kids sue Trump on climate change Congress must come to terms on climate change regulation MORE and Secretary of Labor Tom Perez.

On Wednesday, senators voted to confirm Obama’s pick to lead the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, the first Senate-confirmed head for the agency in seven years. Senators voted to end debate with the bare minimum of 60 votes.

Republican Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiMcConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees Week ahead: Trump expected to shrink two national monuments GOP on verge of opening Arctic refuge to drilling MORE (Alaska) was lobbied hard on the Senate floor to change her vote from ‘no’ to ‘yes’ while Democratic leaders held the vote open for hours so Sen. Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampThe Hill's 12:30 Report Avalanche of Democratic senators say Franken should resign Senate panel moves forward with bill to roll back Dodd-Frank MORE (D-N.D.) could fly back to Washington to cast the deciding vote.

— Bernie Becker contributed

This story was originally published at 7:46 a.m. and was last updated at 1:31 p.m.