Rice, Albright condemn Trump's executive action
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Former Secretaries of State Condoleezza Rice and Madeline Albright on Wednesday criticized President TrumpDonald John TrumpMexican presidential candidate vows to fire back at Trump's 'offensive' tweets Elizabeth Warren urges grads to fight for 'what is decent' in current political climate Jim Carrey takes aim at Kent State grad who posed with AR-10 MORE's executive order on immigration and its potential consequences in the world of foreign affairs.

Rice, who served under President George W. Bush, called Trump's policy "ill-considered and badly delivered" as she spoke alongside Albright at the Watermark Conference for Women, as reported by Politico.

"We do have reasons to control our borders. We do have reasons to vet people ... to make ourselves safer," Rice said.

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The former top diplomat, however, maintained that Americans "are not held together by race, ethnicity, nationality or religion. ... What holds people together is an aspiration."

"That’s why we are particularly vulnerable as a country," Rice continued. "The very best public policy that we have is actually when people come here, and study, and see what it is really like to be in America," she later added.

Albright, who under the Clinton administration became the first woman to serve as secretary of State, also blasted Trump's immigration ban, saying it could spark "terrible problems" in the world.

"We are having even more problems with countries that are on the designated terror list," Albright said, according to Politico, while arguing that the ban is "a gift" to the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.

Albright also took the opportunity to critique Trump's national security adviser, Michael Flynn, and his tough statement on Iran earlier on Wednesday. Flynn condemned Iran's recent ballistic missile test while warning the country that it was put "on notice."

"I can’t imagine you, Condi, storming into the briefing room and saying, 'I’m putting Iran on notice,'" Albright said.

Trump's controversial executive order has been widely criticized by a number of top lawmakers and former officials. The order prohibits immigration from seven majority-Muslim nations for 90 days, bans refugees from entering the U.S. for 120 days and indefinitely suspends resettlement for Syrian refugees.

The White House, however, maintains that the order is a necessary step in taking control of immigration security and developing new ways of properly vetting foreign nationals.