ACLU vows to sue Sessions if he violates Constitution as attorney general
© Greg Nash

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) vowed to sue Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsIntel leaders: Collusion still open part of investigation Republicans jockey for position on immigration Biden to Alabama: No more extremist senators MORE if he violates the Constitution immediately after he was confirmed by the Senate as attorney general.

“If he violates the Constitution, we’ll sue,” the ACLU tweeted on Wednesday night.

The ACLU launched the first successful lawsuit against the Trump administration in late January when it filed a complaint on behalf of two men who were detained at an airport as a result of Trump’s controversial executive order barring travel from seven predominantly Muslim countries to the U.S. 

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A federal judge filed an emergency stay on parts of the executive order at the time as a result.

The group has received a flood of donations and is setting itself up as one of the key players in coming legal fights over Trump's agenda.

Sessions was confirmed by the Senate after a contentious all-night debate about his nomination. Sessions, a Republican senator from Alabama, was eventually confirmed in a 52-47 vote.

The vote came after Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenOvernight Finance: Lawmakers grill Equifax chief over hack | Wells Fargo CEO defends bank's progress | Trump jokes Puerto Rico threw budget 'out of whack' | Mortgage tax fight tests industry clout Michelle Obama is exactly who the Democrats need to win big in 2020 Wells Fargo chief defends bank's progress in tense Senate hearing MORE (D-Mass.) was barred from speaking on the Senate floor against Sessions Tuesday night. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGun proposal picks up GOP support Children’s health-care bill faces new obstacles Dems see Trump as potential ally on gun reform MORE (R-Ky.) said her speech, in which she was reading a letter by the late civil rights activist Coretta Scott King against Sessions's federal judgeship nomination in the 1980s, was impugning another member of the Senate.