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The White House on Friday made public its evidence that Syrian President Bashar Assad's forces used chemical weapons on civilians, with Secretary of State John KerryJohn Forbes KerryKerry: Trump's rhetoric gave North Korea a reason to say 'Hey, we need a bomb' Russian hackers targeted top US generals and statesmen: report Trump officials to offer clarity on UN relief funding next week MORE laying out the administration's case for a military strike.

Kerry emphasized that, given the evidence, the international community has a moral responsibility to take action against the Assad regime.

Reps. Steven Palazzo (R-Miss.), Alan GraysonAlan GraysonPennsylania Dems file ethics complaint against Rep. Barletta The Hill's 12:30 Report Why Republicans took aim at an ethics watchdog MORE (D-Fla.) and Raul Grijalva (D-Ariz.) immediately rejected Kerry's arguments in their tweets. 




“The American intelligence community has high confidence — high confidence. This is common sense. This is evidence. These are facts,” Kerry said. “So the primary question is really no longer what do we know? The question is, what are we — we collectively in the world — going to do about it?”

Rep. Buck McKeon (R-Calif.), the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, said that questions remain, despite the release of the White House's assessment of Syrian chemical weapons use.

And Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.) echoed Palazzo's call for Congress to have a vote before any U.S. military action.

Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainGOP rushes to cut ties to Moore GOP strategist: 'There needs to be a repudiation' of Roy Moore by Republicans World leaders reach agreement on trade deal without United States: report MORE (R-Ariz.) also tweeted his skepticism of whether a military strike would significantly change the momentum of the country's civil war.

Journalist Matt Yglesias linked the situation in Syria with the war in Iraq.

Blogger Erik Erickson corrected Kerry on one aspect of his speech in a snarky tweet.

Arianna Huffington criticized the debate over a hypothetical strike in Syria when the United States is already engaged in military strikes against other nations.

 Meanwhile, columnist David Rohde slammed Obama for not delivering the address himself.

--Megan Wilson and Rebecca Shabad contributed to this report.

--This report was updated at 4:00 p.m.